Category: dhypmuop

Category: dhypmuop

first_imgIn June 2012, the Supreme Court ruled that Obamacare’s mandated Medicaid expansion for low-income Americans should be optional for states. Since then, health policy experts have been paying close attention to how individual states are proceeding with the rollout of national health reform.Two of those experts from Harvard School of Public Health—Benjamin Sommers and John McDonough—were quoted on the subject in an August 7, 2013 Bankrate.com article.As of midsummer, roughly half the states were planning to join the initial Medicaid rollout. States that opt in to the expanded program—which would cover everyone with incomes below 133% of the federal poverty level including childless adults for the first time—would have their expansion completely funded by the federal government for three years. Over time, the federal contribution would decrease to 90%.McDonough, director of HSPH’s Center for Public Health Leadership and an architect of Massachusetts’ health insurance reform—which served as a template for Obama’s Affordable Care Act (ACA)—said that the Medicaid expansion outlined in the ACA is aimed at standardizing eligibility across the nation. Currently, he explained, states vary widely in how much Medicaid they provide their citizens. Read Full Storylast_img read more


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first_imgMore than 600 Harvard faculty, staff, and students laced up their track shoes — or ran barefoot — to participate in the 11th annual Brian J. Honan 5K Run/Walk in Allston-Brighton on Saturday. The race has become a community event, bringing together people from both sides of the Charles River.Proceeds raised from the 5K go to Allston Board of Trade and Brighton Board of Trade scholarships, as well as the Honan family’s charitable fund. Before the national anthem signaled the start, Boston Police Commissioner Bill Evans told the field of 1,500 runners that they made up the largest group of competitors in the race’s history.“This race is in memory of Brian Honan, and we all had the pleasure of working with him,” Evans said. “There was no classier guy, and it’s great to keep his memory alive with this race. So on behalf of the whole Honan family, thank you for coming out.”Honan was deeply involved in public service, sitting on the Boston City Council before entering the race for the Suffolk County District seat. He died in 2002 from complications linked to cancer surgery.Sen. Ed Markey,who was attending the race for the first time, sounded the air horn that set the runners loose. Markey said that he and Rep. Kevin Honan, Brian Honan’s brother, have been friends for 25 years. “The Honans are a fantastic family,” Markey said. “I’m really thrilled to be here. This is a neighborhood event, and you can really feel the community come together: all races, all ages, and all political views, represented in one race.”Kevin Honan, who represents the Allston-Brighton district, agreed that diverse community, and a powerful sense of family, were the hallmarks of the event.“You can see so many demographics in this race: kids running with their parents, an over-80 division, and of course students from all the colleges and universities, including Harvard,” he said.Acknowledging Harvard’s continued participation in the race, Honan, who graduated from Harvard Kennedy School in ’99 with a master’s degree in public policy, said the University was “a tremendous booster” of the annual event.“The undergraduates and Harvard Business School really help us so much, both with funding it, and with bringing in so many runners,” he said. “The runners are extraordinary athletes, and they do a wonderful job.”Annie Harvieux ’16 and Emily Rogers ’15 ran to experience a different neighborhood, and to mix up their athletic training.“We’re on the Nordic Ski Team at Harvard, so we wanted to try this as a training workout, get some experience racing before the season starts,” Rogers said. “I haven’t run this course before, and it’s a great mix of participants.”Every year, Harvard Public Affairs & Communications sponsors registration slots in the 5K for Harvard students, faculty, staff, and alumni.  Harvard Business School and the Harvard College Marathon Challenge also actively participate in sponsoring and recruiting runners.“We’re incredibly honored to be part of such tradition in the Allston-Brighton community. More than 600 runners representing Harvard are a testament to that sense of camaraderie and spirit,” said Christine Heenan, vice president of Harvard Public Affairs & Communications.  “Brian Honan was a great advocate and friend to both Harvard and the Allston-Brighton community and we are proud to continue to help recognize his extraordinary legacy of public service.”In addition to facilitating the runners, Harvard administrators literally went the extra mile. The Harvard College Marathon Challenge, led by Craig Rodgers, continued the tradition of hosting a group run to the race from the Weld Boathouse, logging a mile and a half to the 5K starting line.The race is a great opportunity to explore the city of Boston, get some exercise with other members of the community, and enjoy the last days of summer. Harvieux noted it had one other benefit.“It’s a great break from studying,” she said, smiling.last_img read more


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first_img Related “Harvard has allowed me to grow and it’s moved back the walls that were confining me in Union Beach, New Jersey, giving me space to expand,” said Wingate, who lives in Leverett House. “I feel like I’m a big table in a big room.”The 21-year-old remembers his admission to Harvard as a sort of curious destiny fulfilled years after he first learned of it while watching the ’90s sitcom “Sister, Sister.” On the show, Tia Landry applied to Harvard, but was turned down. Wingate planned on a better outcome.“I asked my mother about Harvard and she said, ‘It’s the best school in the country,’” he recalled. “I said, ‘I want to go there.’”On campus, he immediately found enriching opportunities, working on Dorm Crew and joining the Harvard Krokodiloes. For Wingate, who sang in his childhood church choir and performed in high school musicals, singing in Harvard’s oldest a cappella group was a chance to discover strong friendships and new inspiration.“The first time I ever went on a plane was with the Krokodiloes,” he said. “I have traveled to dozens of cities with the group and learned so much about people, various cultures, and music.”His academic journey has been equally gratifying. With a distant eye toward law school, Wingate planned to concentrate in government, then found himself enthralled by a philosophy course on morality.“I knew I needed to be studying this,” said Wingate, currently a fellow at the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics. “I’m really interested in political theory, and how that is tied to moral philosophy. It’s very applicable to my life and what I imagine my future life to be.”Wingate described Harvard’s financial aid program as not just generous, but also smart.“It’s prudent of Harvard to spend its funds to help diversify the experience for everyone,” he said. “Knowing what it’s like to not have not only gives you perspective, but also makes you appreciative of the space you’re in. Everyone is better off for it.”The breadth of his Harvard relationships has left him humbled and forever changed.“I think about the world in a different way,” said Wingate, who joined the Hasty Pudding Theatricals this year. “I see problems in different lights. The way I read, the way I sing, the way I act, the way I talk has been informed by every person I’ve interacted with here.” Part of a series on the impact of Harvard financial aid on students.When Michael Wingate earned his diploma as valedictorian of his high school class, he didn’t have a wall to hang it on. Hurricane Sandy had destroyed the Union Beach, N.J., house where he lived with his mother and siblings.“My mother and I were nomads for 14 months, living out of our van while battling FEMA and the insurance companies,” said Wingate, whose father left the family before he started high school. “To get our house rebuilt was a long, arduous process. I still had my schoolwork to do and was working as a manager at McDonald’s.”Wingate, the first from his high school to be accepted to Harvard, is now a junior studying government and philosophy, buoyed by the University’s Financial Aid Initiative, which has helped him give as much to his College experience as he has received. More than half of Harvard undergrads receive financial aid, and the majority of students pay only 10 percent of their family’s annual income, an average of $12,000 a year. Students whose family incomes are below $65,000 pay nothing. Student bound for med school explains how financial aid made Harvard, and more, possible From the ‘Fruit Belt’ to the lablast_img read more


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first_imgTags: Editors Six new editors will join The Observer’s Editorial Board in 2014-15 and one current editor will retain her spot, incoming Editor-in-Chief Ann Marie Jakubowski announced Friday.Sophomores Lesley Stevenson, Mary Green, Wei Lin and Gabriela Leskur and juniors Allie Tollaksen and Keri O’Mara will assume positions on the Editorial Board after Spring Break. Junior Kelly Konya will continue as Saint Mary’s Editor, no longer interim.Stevenson, a resident of Breen-Phillips Hall and native of Memphis, Tenn., will serve as News Editor. Majoring in film, television and theatre with a minor in journalism, ethics and democracy, Stevenson joined The Observer in fall 2012 and has since covered this year’s ND Forum on Women in Leadership and the 2014 student government election.Green hails from Tampa, Fla., and lives in Pangborn Hall. She majors in film, television and theatre and English, with a minor in journalism, ethics and democracy. Green will serve as Sports Editor after covering women’s basketball and men’s swimming and spending the past year as Interhall Editor.Lin, a resident of Knott Hall and native of New York, will serve as Photo Editor. He majors in accounting, economics and Chinese and joined The Observer as a photographer in November 2012. He became a nightly photo editor in March 2013 and also writes for the News department intermittently.Leskur will take over as Viewpoint Editor. A native of Cleveland, and resident of Farley Hall, she majors in the Program of Liberal Studies with an anthropology minor. Leskur currently writes for The Observer’s Scene Department, including a popular recurring column titled “Gabriela’s Double Dog Dare.”Tollaksen, from Racine, Wis., majors in psychology and minors in poverty studies. The Farley Hall resident will be Scene Editor after joining the staff last year and serving as Associate Scene Editor this semester.O’Mara, a resident of Welsh Family Hall, will serve as Graphics Editor. Hailing from Albany, N.Y., she majors in graphic design and minors in peace studies. O’Mara has done design work for the Arts and Letters Office of Communication, Scholastic Magazine, Junior Class Council and the student peace conference.Konya will continue as Saint Mary’s Editor. The Le Mans Hall resident and Twinsburg, Ohio, native majors in English writing and English literature and has experience as Associate Saint Mary’s Editor last semester and current interim editor.last_img read more


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first_imgA few miles from Lakeland, Ga., farmer Glyndon Register walks in one of his powder-drycotton fields.”I’ve never seen the subsoil moisture as low as it is now,” he said.”The dirt’s so hard, the seed that did germinate turned and started going the otherway.”About 40 percent of the seeds never broke through the hard, dry soil. The cotton thatdid grow looks deceptively healthy.”It should be probably twice as big as what it is right now,” he said.”The drought has really taken a toll on it this year.”Worst May Be Yet to ComeWorse yet, University of Georgia agricultural scientists say the worst could be yet tocome. Cotton and peanuts, the state’s top two income-producing row crops, just reachedtheir critical time for water.The two crops, which bring Georgia farmers about half of their $2 billion annual incomefrom crops, need about 2 inches of water each week.”If we don’t get rainfall between the middle of June and early to mid-September,it could be devastating to our peanut crop,” said John Beasley, a peanut scientistwith the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.That’s the worst news yet in Lakeland, where every dollar a Lanier County farmer spendsgenerates an extra $2.50 in economic benefit, according to UGA economists.Rural Economies Hurting”We’ve already had some of our local businesses lay off people because they didn’thave the work,” said Elvin Andrews, Lanier County Extension Service agent. “Theyweren’t making the sales they normally do to warrant keeping their employees on.”Andrews said a troubling sign of the times is that last year’s forestry sales almost tripledin the county. Farmers were converting their standing timber to cash, he said, to make upfor farming losses.Unfortunately, this year won’t make things any better. “We’re going to behurt,” Andrews said. “Even with normal weather, we won’t produce a normal cropthis year.”Jim Watson, chief loan officer with Farmers and Merchants Bank in Lakeland, made about$5 million worth of operating, equipment and land loans to Lanier County farmers thisyear. And he knows some of his customers won’t be able to pay back all they owe.Farmers Struggling to Survive”I’m afraid some of those who are highly leveraged and owe a good bit of money aregoing to have a hard time coming through this,” he said.Watson sees the drought’s effects on Lanier and other rural counties in real terms, andit bothers him. “If you have any compassion at all, yeah, it concerns you,” hesaid. “It hurts us some to see this going on.”Down the block from the bank, third-generation car and truck dealer Dana Giddens seesthe drought affecting his business long before harvest.”Our real strong buyers are kind of waiting to see what happens,” Giddenssaid. “Most of our buyers seem to be a little apprehensive. That’s always the subjectof conversation: how dry it is.”The Drought Goes OnIt’s terribly dry, said Bert Simpson, whose inch-long grass crunches as he walksthrough a pasture near town. “It ought to be 10 or 12 inches tall right now,” hesaid.But the pasture must provide food for his 120 cows. “We usually get two to threecuttings of hay off this pasture,” he said, “and I think we’ll be lucky to getone this year.”He hasn’t been lucky so far. Without rain, his cows’ luck could run out. “We’lltry and feed them as long as we can,” Simpson said. “And if we can’t, we’ll haveto sell them. That’s about the only choice we’ve got.”last_img read more


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first_imgFood prices are reaching record highs as the summer “Grilling Season” hits full throttle on Memorial Day. Meat prices are stable now but will increase by Thanksgiving or Christmas, say University of Georgia economists. From March to April, U.S. food prices increased almost 1 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistic Consumer Price Index. This is the largest one-month jump in 18 years. If the rate continues, food next year will cost 12 percent more than food today, said John McKissick, an economist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.Meat prices overall haven’t changed much recently, he said. But they will by the end of the year. More of the nation’s corn crop is being used to make ethanol. This leaves less corn to feed animals, making it more expensive. Livestock producers are starting to cut production because of it. “Right now, we are not really feeling the impact in the meat market of these high feed prices. Prices we are seeing now are reflections of the decisions made last year,” McKissick said. The price of cheaper cuts of meat is increasing because the demand for them is also increasing. The demand for choice steaks is decreasing, driving down their prices.“What we see is people will trade down, people will quit buying rib-eyes, but will buy sirloin. They have a grocery budget and a certain amount they are willing to spend on beef,” said Curt Lacy, a livestock economist with the UGA Cooperative Extension Service. “People will trade steak for ground beef or steak for roast.”Ground chuck has increased 20 cents per pound over the last year, while choice boneless steaks have decreased eight cents per pound. Pork prices are also down. Ham is 13 cents cheaper per pound. Pork chops are a penny cheaper per pound than they were last year, according to Lacy. Chicken prices have increased 10 cents per pound regardless of the cut. Due to the structure of the industry and short life-cycle of chickens, consumers can expect chicken prices to go even higher in August as producers adjust to rising feed costs, McKissick said. Pork producers increased production last year due to several years of good profits, but now they are cutting back, too. “We have to cut back in the animal industry,” McKissick said. “There will be less meat for consumers to eat and it will be at higher prices.”Consumers can look for sales and buy now, freeze and eat the meat later, said Elizabeth Andress, food safety expert with the UGA Cooperative Extension Service. By April SorrowUniversity of Georgia “Most meats and poultry, for best quality, keep three to four months in the freezer, although some raw meat roasts and cuts may last up to a year if packaged and stored correctly,” she said. “Hams have a much shorter shelf life and some types are limited to one to two months in the freezer.”(April Sorrow is a news editor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more


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first_imgWe’ve seen it before, and we’ll see it again: companies—and, sometimes, entire industries—left in the dust because they failed to keep up with the pace of change.It’s not hard to think of a few cautionary tales, especially in the digital era—consider Kodak or pay phones—and the banking industry is far from immune. Tech giants, including Google, Apple, and Amazon, as well as new players, like Kickstarter and Venmo, are starting to gain a foothold. And megabanks continue to innovate, offering new mobile and online tools in an attempt to compete.With all this customer-grabbing innovation going on, what should credit unions do? Panic? Cross fingers? Do nothing? Do everything? Luckily, history provides us with a few do’s and don’ts.Do: Take your competition seriously. continue reading » 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more


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first_imgTech-based agriculture company TaniHub Group is eyeing expansion to Kalimantan, Sulawesi and Sumatra in the next few years, gunning for wider distribution for its products, as the firm’s operation passes its four-year mark, according to an executive.“One of the challenging conditions is that some [farmers] do not have the capacity to distribute their produce across Indonesia,”  CEO Ivan Arie Sustiawan said Monday in a virtual presser.“Imagine if there is a big harvest, say, for mangoes in East Java,” he added. “If we can distribute this product evenly not only to Java but also to Sumatra, Sulawesi and Kalimantan, the price will become more stable and there will be no drastic drops in prices simply because of the harvest.”Established in mid-2016, TaniHub, which sells the agricultural produce online, partners with more than 30,000 smallholder farmers and operates five distribution hubs across Indonesia. The service has seen increasing demand since the COVID-19 outbreak, as consumers shift to shopping online.Read also: Online groceries thrive as customers avoid supermarkets TaniHub Group announced in April that it had secured US$17 million to expand its services to up to 100,000 farmers by 2021.The new investment, which is an extension round of its series A funding, brings the total equity funding raised by the company to $29 million since 2016.Read also: TaniHub Group raises $17m to expand services to 100,000 farmers by 2021TaniHub Group operates three business arms: online food marketplace TaniHub, peer-to-peer (P2P) lending platform TaniFund and supply chain services unit TaniSupply.Despite the ongoing health crisis, the company has developed its first packing and processing center (PPC) in Malang, East Java. It will officially launch the facility on Sept. 24, the company announced.“We developed the Malang PPC to respond to the needs or challenges with regard to fast production and processing, as well as uniformity in processing,” said Vincentius Sariyo, the director of TaniSupply.The facility, to be operated by TaniSupply, uses machines that can sort fruit products based on texture, size and weight. It is expected to reduce processing by two days, according to Sariyo.TaniHub Group also plans to develop such a facility in Majalengka regency, West Java and Medan in North Sumatra in the near future, as the start-up wanted to develop the facility in every province, he added.TaniFund also recorded 250 new farmers and 43 new farmer groups registered for its services. However, farmers have been facing difficulties in selling produce as the country imposes large-scale social restrictions to prevent the spread of the virus. Farmers’ terms of trade fell below the key threshold to 99.47 in May, according to Statistics Indonesia (BPS) data, with value below 100 indicating farmers booked deficits.The farmers’ terms of trade has since rebounded to 100.09 in July.Although some of its merchants have been forced to close, the tech company stated that it also relied on its operations in small cities with fewer epidemic-related restrictions compared to those in big cities, according to Ivan.With increased online shopping, the company also plans to recruit more staff. center_img Topics :last_img read more


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first_imgOle Gunnar Solskjaer promised a return to the “United way”, bringing through young players and committing to an attacking approach and he certainly boosted the mood of the club after the misery of the late Mourinho period.But the reason the fans fury is vented at Woodward and not Solskjaer is not just because the Norwegian is a popular former player but because of the club’s repeated failings in the transfer market.Solskjaer wanted to bring in compatriot Erling Haaland in January, with the striker, rated one of the most exciting young forwards in Europe, reportedly keen to join United.Yet, somehow, United allowed Borussia Dortmund to snap him up from RB Salzburg and the dream of a young attack with Haaland flanked by Mason Greenwood and Marcus Rashford was unfulfilled.Jude Bellingham, a 17-year-old from Birmingham City, was the next major target, the kind of box-to-box midfielder United is lacking, but again he chose to move to Dortmund rather than Salford.This window has seen United’s well documented pursuit of one of Dortmund’s prize possessions, English winger Jadon Sancho, but with the deadline looming on Monday, there is no sign of a deal.United has brought in Donny van de Beek from Ajax, who Solskjaer has so far, in the league, restricted to appearances from the bench.Media reports suggest United is close to acquiring Brazilian left back Alex Telles from Porto and Edinson Cavani, the Uruguayan striker, but a 33-year-old free agent is hardly the kind of signing the fans were expecting.Mourinho had long tried to persuade Woodward to bring in a top quality central defender and Solskjaer did get Harry Maguire last summer, but he looks badly in need of a quality partner.United isn’t the first club to struggle to get the players they want but it is an unusual position for it to be in after the years when Ferguson pulled off coup after coup in the market.Many fans blame Woodward and those sentiments were strengthened by recent comments from former player Patrice Evra who criticised United for sending “lawyers” rather than soccer people to talk to potential signings.Former captain Gary Neville, now a pundit for Sky Sports, believes the players are being impacted by the constant struggles in recruitment.”It’s the psychological damage of Manchester United not bringing the players in that I also think is hampering the players’ thoughts,” he said on Sunday.”They see Liverpool sign players, they see City sign players, they see Chelsea sign players. The minute Spurs go 2-1 up it’s almost as if all those negative thoughts drain every single little bit of confidence out of them.”(That is) not right – but that’s what’s happened here. I think ultimately these players at this moment in time felt as though the club wanted support,” he said.Not for the first time, Woodward heads into a deadline day with all eyes on him and with the club back in crisis mode. Indeed, had he taken one route out of the stadium, he would have had a taste of the frustrations of those fans, with a small group gathered with a banner calling for his resignation and that of the American Glazer family, who own the club.The protest would not have been a spontaneous reaction from fans, who due to COVID restrictions, were forced to watch the game on television, but almost certainly an expression of deeper, longer-established discontent.Seven years after Alex Ferguson ended his trophy-laden 26 years in charge at the club with his 13th Premier League title, United is still struggling to get anywhere near the levels the club took for granted under the Scotsman.David Moyes and Louis van Gaal came and went without moving the club forward and Jose Mourinho, now at Spurs, masterminded Sunday’s destruction against the club who sacked him less than two years ago. Topics :center_img Another season, another mess at Manchester United.On Sunday, the club which prides itself on being one of the biggest global brands in sport was humiliated in a 6-1 home Premier League defeat by Tottenham Hotspur.Executive vice-chairman Ed Woodward, sat watching alone in the stand, would surely have considered how an Old Trafford full of spectators would have reacted to such a loss coming near the end of another frustrating transfer window.last_img read more


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first_img A season out of Europe could potentially cost as much as £100 million ($123m) and City had hoped for an early resolution before the coronavirus outbreak took hold. CEO Ferran Soriano said shortly after the ban was announced that he hoped it would be settled by early summer. He also denied the allegations, insisting the club will do “everything that can be done to prove” their innocence. City say they have “irrefutable evidence” that the claims are not true while Mr Shea believes the club will also argue about the manner of UEFA’s investigation. “It’s clear from the statements that City made following the decision and from their previous attempt at CAS to stop the disciplinary case being referred to UEFA’s adjudicatory chamber, that they are certainly peeved about how the disciplinary process has been conducted with various media leaks and so I have no doubt they will raise a number of procedural arguments,” he said. “In any event, the CAS panel will consider this case de novo which means they will review all the evidence and arguments from both parties afresh and reach its own decision, which City have actually welcomed by referring to the need for an impartial judgment at CAS. “City refer to irrefutable evidence in support of its position so, notwithstanding all their arguments regarding procedural unfairness, it’s certainly possible that they will deny that sponsorship deals were inflated and that there has been a breach of the regulations. I’ve not seen the evidence so I obviously can’t comment on whether City are likely to succeed with such an argument or not. “I strongly suspect that City will also try to challenge the legality of the FFP regulations on the basis that they contravene EU competition law. CAS previously deemed them to be compliant with EU competition law in the case involving Galatasaray in 2016, but I am expecting City to raise fresh arguments on this issue. “Finally, I fully expect City to argue that the sanction of a two-season ban is disproportionate. AC Milan were also handed a two-year ban in 2018 for failing to comply with the FFP regulations. On appeal to CAS, it was held that the Adjudicatory Chamber had failed to consider all the facts and so it referred the case back to the Adjudicatory Chamber to make a proportionate decision based on all the facts.” City also have another trick up their sleeve, according to Mr Shea. He says they can look to the example of former Peru captain Paolo Guerrero, who was allowed to play in the 2018 World Cup when a Swiss supreme court froze a 14-month ban for a positive drugs test. “If City’s appeal is rejected, they could potentially take the case to the Swiss Federal Tribunal for a further appeal or even the European Commission, European Court of Justice in Luxembourg or European Union Court of Human Rights depending on the arguments,” Mr Shea added. Read Also:Allegation: Arsenal want us out of Europe – Man City “At that point, the club could seek a suspension of the sanction in order to play in next year’s Champions League – an example of this is the Peru player Guerrero.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Coronavirus outbreak has condemned the world of football to a near-total shutdown and schisms remain over the short-term future of the game. Debates rage over what to do with the remainder of current seasons; when should they resume? How should they restart? Should they be voided altogether? Manchester City, currently banned from the Champions League for the next two years by UEFA over a serious breach of Financial Fair Play regulations, are among those clubs caught in the crossfire with potential knock-on effects for Pep Guardiola’s side. The Premier League champions have appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) to overturn the decision but that case is up in the air with no current date for it to be heard and the Swiss institution not hosting any in-person hearings until May at the earliest. The situation is further complicated by the uncertainty surrounding the European footballing calendar with all leagues, other than Belarus, shut down and no way of knowing when they will be completed. Champions League football is also suspended with no plans to restart and City’s second leg against Real Madrid was postponed just before all football in England was closed down. City deny any wrongdoing over UEFA’s investigation. However, with an appeal not going to be heard any time soon, the club could lodge an application to “stay” the punishment which, if upheld, would allow them to play in next season’s competition. That possibility has seemingly not gone down well with City’s league counterparts; eight sides in the top 10 have reportedly written to CAS outlining their objections. John Shea, a dispute resolution lawyer at Lewis Silkin’s sports practice, says City’s Premier League rivals are not currently parties in the case and would have to prove they would be affected by any “stay”. “An application to stay the execution of a decision is usually submitted at the same time as the statement of appeal. City’s appeal was submitted back in February and at that stage I don’t think City requested a stay because CAS proceedings can proceed on an expedited basis, meaning a decision could be made by the summer and before the start of next season,” he told Goal. “However, Covid-19 may have affected this timetable especially, so there is likely to be a backlog and that’s assuming that it is safe to return at that stage. “Arbitrators and parties are now encouraged to conduct hearings by video conference or to render decisions based on written submissions, but this is unlikely to be appropriate in a case of this importance. “Under R37 of the CAS code, a party may apply for a stay of the decision through what is called provisional measures and if such an application is made, the other party is required to respond to the application within 10 days. “Other Premier League clubs are not currently parties to the proceedings but if they can prove that they are directly affected by the decision, for example because they could qualify for the Champions League in City’s place, then they might have standing to intervene in the CAS proceedings and make submissions. 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