Month: July 2019

Month: July 2019

first_imgThe Brexit process could see disabled people who were born on the continent but have lived here for many years unable to secure permanent residency in the UK, because they have never been able to work.UK law says citizens of the European Economic Area (EEA)* cannot secure permanent residence – and apply for British citizenship – unless they can show they have lived for at least five years in this country as a job seeker, worker, student, or self-employed person, or they are economically “self-sufficient”.Students and those who are self-sufficient must also show they have comprehensive private health insurance.The concerns were raised at a workshop in London this week, part of a project** that aims to provide information on how the final deal between the European Union (EU) and the UK government might impact on people’s rights.The government has pledged to protect the rights of EU nationals already living in the UK, but only if the EU grants similar protection to British citizens living in other EU states.But many EEA nationals are worried that agreement might not be reached between the two sides, so they want to secure UK residency rights before the country leaves the EU.Disabled journalist and activist Christiane Link told the workshop that she is helping run a Facebook group dedicated to supporting EEA citizens who want to secure UK residency rights.Many of them have been living in the UK for many years, but were born abroad.Some of those struggling to secure residency rights are disabled people who have not been able to work, and have claimed out-of-work disability benefits.Another group affected is carers, whose contribution is not treated by the UK government as work.Professor Anna Lawson, head of the Centre for Disability Studies and the new Disability Law Hub at the University of Leeds, told the workshop that this was one of the “hugely important issues that we need to be engaged in” as disabled people and disabled people’s organisations, as the government prepares for Brexit.Link told Disability News Service: “It will mainly affect people who are not working or didn’t work long enough. You must have worked for five years continuously.”A German citizen, she has been living in the UK for 10 years but will not have a problem securing residency rights after Brexit because she has worked for more than five years.But she said that this will not apply to many other disabled EEA citizens.And although the UK government may not directly force them to leave the country, it could refuse to continue paying them the benefits they need to survive.She said: “If you deny people who are disabled access to benefits then they are virtually unable to live here, so that is indirectly kicking them out of the country.”One of those affected is 41-year-old Yragael Drouet (pictured, talking to Link at the workshop), who came to the UK from France as a four-year-old child with his mother and has lived here ever since, and has received out-of-work disability benefits.He believes there are many disabled people who are EEA citizens and face the same barriers that he now faces in securing UK residency rights.He said: “The state obviously believes that I was unable to do full-time work so surely there should be some sort of get-out clause for disabled people [like me].”He says that if he is denied free healthcare he would have to return to France.He said: “I am 41 and I came here with my mother when I was four. It would be crazy. I have family there but I have nowhere to live.”He does not believe the UK government would allow this to happen “maliciously” but he fears that “it is something we are walking into” without realising.The Home Office website says that reasons to reject applications for permanent residence include “failure to supply evidence of exercising a treaty right as a job seeker, worker, self-employed person, self sufficient person, or student”.A Home Office spokesman said: “The rights of EU nationals living in the UK remain unchanged while we are a member of the European Union.“The home secretary has been clear that she wants to protect the status of EU nationals already living here, and the only circumstances in which that wouldn’t be possible is if British citizens’ rights in European member states were not protected in return.“There is no requirement to register for documentation certifying permanent residence to confirm this status.”He said the requirement for comprehensive sickness insurance is set out in the EU’s free movement directive and applies to all member states.But Link pointed out that the European Commission stated in 2012 that the UK government did not treat entitlement to free NHS treatment as equivalent to comprehensive sickness insurance, and that this “breaches EU law”.The Home Office had not been able to respond to this point by noon today (Thursday) because of yesterday’s terrorist incident in Westminster.Link added: “In general, I think it would be good if the EU would have made better provisions for disabled people (not only those who are working) but most of the issues right now like comprehensive sickness insurance and carer status are caused by the interpretation of the UK, not by the EU.”A petition calling for the system of qualifying for permanent residency to be reformed – including scrapping the requirement for disabled people and carers to have comprehensive sickness insurance – has secured nearly 35,000 signatures.*The EEA includes all EU countries as well as Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. EEA membership allows these three countries to be part of the EU’s single market, which allows free movement of goods, capital, services and people between member states**The Brexit Takeaways project is organising events in London, Northern Ireland, Gibraltar and Belgium to provide information on how the different options for a Brexit deal could impact on their rights. The project is led by the European Citizen Action Service, New Europeans, the European Disability Forum and the EU Rights Cliniclast_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgAn homeless encampment resolution is underway at the snarl of freeway ramps and bike paths located at Cesar Chavez Street and Potrero Avenue. The so-called Hairball encampment is one of the last large encampments in the Mission District.  In the next few weeks, homeless people won’t be allowed to camp under the freeway overpasses that have been used by homeless residents for years — perhaps decades. Once cleared, cyclists and pedestrians will be able to ride through the tangle that goes under the freeway without encountering obstructed paths. “The intention of our encampment resolution work is to resolve an encampment and work with the neighbors and the community to make sure … folks don’t move back in,” said Emily Cohen, a policy manager at the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing. Cohen said her department had started finding Navigation Center placements for encampment residents two weeks ago.So far, 19 encampments have been resolved citywide, and 17 have remained clear. Only a few large encampments remain in the Mission, including one on 14th and Shotwell streets, and another on Division near Best Buy. “That means having conversations with people who come back to the space and saying, ‘you’re not able to camp here any more — this is no longer a camping zone,’” Cohen said. After an encampment is “resolved,” it’s up to the police to keep it clear. “If you go back to an area that’s resolved — it is a law enforcement issue,” said Kelley Cutler of the Homeless Coalition. But Cutler added a resolution’s success hinges on where homeless individuals go after leaving the Navigation Center. “It’s really important to look at who is discharged back to street,” she said. ADVERTISEMENT 5 Below Market Rate (BMR) Rental Apartments available at 3000 23rd St., San Francisco, CA 94110. Applications must be received by 5PM, Nov. 7, 2017, and must either be submitted online here or mailed in with a self-addressed stamped envelope to: 3000 23rd St. BMR, P.O. Box 420847, San Francisco, CA 94124. Applications available here or picked up from an agency listed here.In a recent interview, District 9 Supervisor Hillary Ronen said the Hairball “could not be more urgent for me.” “I’m urgently concerned about the safety of people camping in the Hairball and worried that someone’s going to get killed,” she said. On average, Cohen said, an encampment resolution takes three weeks to complete, and becomes officially “resolved” when the police and the Department of Public Works move residents into the Navigation Center on so-called “resolution day” and restrict them from coming back. The outreach team had placed 17 people in a Navigation Center and four people were in the process of getting beds, Cohen said at an Oct. 11 meeting hosted by the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition. An assessment by the department showed some 40 people living in the encampment in August. Cohen said an initial assessment taken not long before counted around 60 residents. Public Works and Caltrans are blocking off Hairball’s most dangerous areas to make sure they’re not re-encamped, Ronen said. Throughout the Mission District, the resolution strategy seems to be taking effect. At a recent Board of Supervisors meeting, Ronen declared that the number of homeless tents in the Mission is down from 200 to 50, according to a count her office performed. Later, she said they noticed a reduction after the Navigation Center on 1515 South Van Ness opened. “We’re working to get more navigation center space so there is enough space for everyone who’s living in the Hairball,” she said. But over at the Hairball on the Monday, it became clear how difficult it is to get complete buy-in from residents who have been living on the streets for years. Some people living in the encampment said they didn’t qualify for a spot at the Navigation Center or didn’t want to go. “I feel it’s a good thing to do,” said Corinthians Redmond, who received an offer from Homeless Outreach Team to move into the Navigation Center. “But I would rather take care of myself on the streets. I’d rather be in a place where I’m comfortable.” Redmond said he’s reluctant to move into the center because many of his possessions are on the street, and he said he couldn’t move all of them into the center. He also said the center’s atmosphere isn’t right for him. “I can’t be in a closed area with too many people,” he said. Romeo Estrello said he missed the outreach team, but he probably wouldn’t take an offer anyway.“A huge percentage of us don’t want to be in a shelter,” Estrello said. “It’s almost like prison. It’s rowdy, it’s loud, and the Navigation Center is the same.” Although Estrello has been in and out of numerous city shelters, he said he’s never been to the Navigation Center. Yet he imagines the “dorm setting” would yield many similar anxieties about noise, overcrowding and theft. “Don’t really feel at home because of the dorm setting with people you don’t really know,” he said.  Others, like a woman who goes by Norma M., took a placement at the 1515 South Van Ness Navigation Center a couple weeks ago. But, on a recent Monday, she was out at the Hairball encampment to be with her 25-year-old daughter, Vetta, who was waiting for a placement in the center. Her other daughter, who is 18, already received a placement, she said. “I’m waiting for the HOT team to come and get her,” Norma said. “I can’t be indoors and have her out here.” Norma was feeling positive about finding housing during her stay at the center. Her brother, she said, found housing at an SRO after 120 days at the center. “I’m optimistic to find something — a hole in the wall or an actual place,” she said, noting that last winter was especially harsh. “I’m tired of that,” she said.  But, like Estrello and Redmond, she was not keen on shelter life. “The Navigation Center isn’t what the media is saying it is,” she said. “You need to light a match under their ass — the food is microwaved and the water is cold.” Some, like a 33-year-old man who went by Ruben, said they didn’t qualify because they hadn’t been homeless long enough. Ruben said the outreach team told him he didn’t qualify after he told them he had been homeless for eight months. “That made me lose hope in programs in general,” he said, spray painting a bicycle. “People who are homeless for 10 to 12 years want to be on the streets.” “I’m gonna get on my feet by myself,” he added. “The more I stick around here, the more fucked up it’s gonna be.”Priority is given to people who have been homeless for 13 years, said Cutler of the Homeless Coalition. But “if it’s a resolution, they should be offering everyone in that encampment something,” Cutler said. A resolution might be in its early stages if only some are being offered services, “because they only start with folks who are high need,” she added. Yet some felt neglected by the outreach team because they weren’t staked out in the encampment. “They walk right past me and don’t ask,” said a man who called himself Dallas, who was sitting on a bench at James Rolph Jr. Playground, which sits adjacent to the Hairball. He said he’s been on the streets “too long.” “At least they can ask me,” he said. “They just look at me.” Tags: Cesar Chavez Street • homeless Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%center_img 0%last_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgKYLE Amor insists the opportunity to walk out at Wembley in the Ladbrokes Challenge Cup final is all the ammunition St Helens need to defeat Leeds Rhinos in the semi-final on Friday July 31 (8.00pm) at the Halliwell Jones Stadium.St Helens, who have lifted Rugby League’s oldest Cup 12 times, last appeared at Wembley in 2008 where they were victorious over Hull FC.“The motivation is already there to get a chance to play at Wembley,” he said. “We owe it to each other as players, our coaching staff and the fans to put in a good performance against the form team in the competition.“We want to put a few wrongs right after two disappointing games against them this season and ultimately get to the final in August and kick on from there.”Amor played for Leeds in 2010 but that will count for nothing on Friday.“A few years ago I always wanted to show them that they were wrong in letting me go, but after a few years of thinking about the reasons why they let me go, I just treat it as no bigger game than as if we’re playing Warrington or Wigan,” he said. “It’s always nice when you do beat your old team, but it’s not like I go into the game bitter or angry towards them.“I’m a St Helens player and all I care about is getting through to the final with this group of players I’ve grown to love and respect.”Tickets for the Ladbrokes Challenge Cup Semi Final remain on sale from the Ticket Office at Langtree Park, by calling 01744 455 052 or online here.last_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgSAINTS have signed dynamic and powerful back rower Zeb Taia until the end of the 2019 season.Experienced in the NRL, Super League and on the International stage, he is versatile and will add leadership to Keiron Cunningham’s side.Born in Auburn in New South Wales, Taia played junior for Enfield Federals and St Clair Comets before being picked up by the Parramatta Eels.He then moved to Newcastle Knights in 2007; a club he stayed with until he signed for Catalans Dragons in 2012.Zeb was a standout performer in Perpignan and after being named in the Super League Dream Team in 2015 opted to return to NRL with the Gold Coast Titans.All in all, the 32-year-old has played more than 210 first grade games – including five at International level.He captained the Cook Islands in the 2013 Rugby League World Cup and also appeared at Test level for New Zealand.Saints Head Coach Keiron Cunningham said: “We’re delighted to have signed a player of Zeb’s calibre and he will bolster our squad immediately. He is powerful, possesses a great offload and like our other signings this season, will bring big game experience to the Saints.”As a result of the move, Saints have allowed second rower Joe Greenwood to take up a contract in the NRL with the Gold Coast Titans.The 23-year-old has agreed a deal after originally joining the Saints from Saddleworth Rangers in 2011.Keiron added: “We wouldn’t want to stand in the way of any player wishing to ply their trade elsewhere and Joe has been given a good opportunity at the Gold Coast.“It’s always difficult to lose a homegrown player and personally I will be sad to see him leave. I’ve worked hard with Joe to develop his game and help him grow as a person – and he has done just that.“Hopefully, one day after a successful NRL career, he will pull on the Red V again.”Joe played 77 times for the Saints after making his debut against his hometown Oldham in 2012.last_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgThe star met our Junior Members on Tuesday and also told us how excited he is to finally make his bow.Tickets for the clash are available from the Ticket Office at the Totally Wicked Stadium, by calling 01744 455 052 or online here.last_img


Month: July 2019

first_imgThe game was over as a contest in the first quarter with Saints 28 points to the good. The game opened in scintillating fashion with Saints opening their account after only 58 seconds.A good carry from Nico Rizzelli put the Saints on the front foot and his quick play the ball set the attack flowing. Jack Welsby ran down the right, put Josh Simm into space and as he dragged his would be tackler with him for 20 metres he saw Jamie Pye storming up on the inside. Simm passed it inside and the big prop went the final 30 metres to score under the posts.A great kick defence saw the Broncos caught in goal and five tackles later Paul Nash was dummying his way over for the Saints second try.Yet another knock on from the visitors in their own 20 metre area gave the Saints an attacking scrum on the left. As the ball emerged it was whipped to the right for Tom Nisbett to go over. Lewis Dodd converting his third of the night from the touchline.On 15 minutes Josh Simm punished the Broncos again going 80 metres after an error in their first attack of the game.Saints fifth try in the first quarter came when repeated offloads from Dodd, Matty Foster and Rizzelli saw John Hutchings dive into the corner.After a breathless opening the Broncos started to find their feet with the Saints finding it more difficult to make ground. The final action of the half saw a repeat of his earlier effort as John Hutchings again dived over for his brace.Saints had been running at 80% completion in the first half to the Broncos 50 but this completely turned around after the break as the Saints found it difficult to hold onto the ball.We did manage to score in the 47th minute mind as Simm stepped past the full back after a good run from Warren Smith.Lewis Dodd’s trademark side step saw him score a well-deserved try as he stood up the defence, before the Broncos got their consolation try on the hour darting over at the play the ball, the try being awarded despite the protestations of the Saints players that it was in fact short.The game had got very scrappy but in the last 10 minutes, Saints put the icing on the cake, scoring three more tries. Drives from Pye and Lewis Baxter with an offload to Jack Welsby saw Saints on the attack. From the play the ball Nash gave Ryan Horne enough room to step inside the cover to the posts.Nico Rizzelli got the tenth as Matty Foster put him over after Welsby had traversed the line right and then left looking for an opening. Foster then got a try himself on the whistle taking Pye’s Jamie Lyon-style out-the-back flick pass to go in.It was a routine win in the end with Huddersfield away on Sunday 17th March, up next.Match Summary:Saints U19’s:Tries: Jamie Pye (1), Paul Nash (5), Tom Nisbett (10), Josh Simm (15 & 60), John Hutchings (22 & 36), Lewis Dodd (47), Ryan Horne (69), Nico Rizzelli (75), Matty Foster (78).Goals: Lewis Dodd 5 from 8, Josh Simm 1 from 1, Jack Welsby 0 from 2.London Broncos U19’s:Tries: Christopher Ball (62).Goals: Oliver Leyland 1 from 1.Half Time: 32-0 Full Time: 56-6Teams:Saints: 1. Jack Welsby; 5. Tom Nisbett, 3. Josh Simm, 4. Nico Rizzelli, 2. John Hutchings; 6. Ryan Horne, 7. Lewis Dodd; 8. Jamie Pye, 9. Paul Nash, 10. Kye Siyani, 11. Matty Foster, 12. Sam Royle. 13. Jake Wingfield. Subs: 14. Keenan McDaid, 15.Harry Brooks, 16. Lewis Baxter, 17. Warren Smith.London: 1. Charlie Gamble; 2. Alfie Edwards, 3. Max Clarke, 4. Jonah Varela, 5. Teddy Davidson; 6. Oliver Leyland, 7. Rian Horsman; 8. Christian Gale, 9. Robert Oakley, 10. Will Budd, 11. Christopher Ball, 12. Josh Hodson, 13. Rory Gray Subs: 14. Jamie Humphries, 15. Isaiah Lowe Stuart, 16. Ramon Silva, 23. Delaine Bedward.last_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgThe trophies for runners-up and champions of Michael McGowan Co-Ed Softball Tournament (Photo: Justin McKee/WWAY) CAROLINA BEACH, NC (WWAY) — In what’s becoming an October tradition in Carolina Beach, twelve softball teams converged on Mike Chappell Park this weekend, all for a good cause.It was part of the fifth annual Michael McGowan Co-Ed Softball Tournament.- Advertisement – McGowan was a beloved member of the Carolina Beach community as chef and owner of Michael’s Seafood, until he lost his battle with cystic fibrosis.Proceeds fund a culinary arts scholarship at Cape Fear Community College. The money also supports the Carolina Beach Parks and Recreation Department.“Michael, he would pitch a hand any time he could. As far as his kids, his kids still stay right over the bridge. They’re involved in all sports on the island, so they give back any time they can,” said tournament director Tony Scott.Related Article: CFCC educates students on the importance of protecting the environmentThe tournament generally raises $4500 to $5500 in sponsorships every year.last_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_img She teaches third graders at Murrayville Elementary School and she’s been with the same students for nearly two years.  This is the first time she has had the opportunity to “loop” with her kids.  Looping means she teaches the same students two years in a row.“I moved up to a new grade this year,” she says, “and brought this crew up with me and we haven’t stopped learning.”Her classroom agrees that being together for two years is a great thing and her kids obviously love Ms. Baltezegar.Related Article: Brunswick, New Hanover County schools to remain closed through September 28Parents love her too with one saying she “brings energy, love, innovation, and passion for her students” to class every day.After 27 years of teaching she says a “lot has changed, but kids still rise to the challenge.”Her advice for all students has been the same for years: “Be the best you can be and then help others.” NEW HANOVER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — “I feel really blessed!”  Kimberly Baltezegar exclaims her love of teaching as soon as she found out she is the WWAY Michael and Son Teacher of the Week.“I feel really blessed,” she continued, “to be in this profession so long and to still love it!”- Advertisement – last_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgWILMINGNTON, NC (WWAY) — A Wilmington man is in stable condition following a shooting early Sunday morning, according to Wilmington Police Department.Police responded to a call in reference to shots fired in the 1900 block of Carolina Beach Road around 1:30 a.m.WPD says the victim, 25-year-old Dishaune Bunting, was shot multiple times and is currently at New Hanover Regional Medical Center.- Advertisement – This is an on-going investigation. Anyone with information is asked to contact WPD or use Text A Tip.last_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgNEW HANOVER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — A man who has spent the last three months in jail will now be set free after a court hearing Thursday afternoon, but his family says he shouldn’t have been there in the first place.Last November, Hiram Farmer‘s mother filed paperwork to have him involuntarily committed for a mental evaluation.- Advertisement – Things went south when police tried to take him into custody and Farmer landed in jail.Police say 35-year-old Farmer tried to run and they took him down.A video shows police punching Farmer, who was then tased after police say he bit an officer on the arm.Related Article: Two men busted on drug charges at Whiteville home“It speaks to issues with mental health and how law enforcement handles people who are mentally ill,” said Rhonda Sekhmet-Ra.Outside of the New Hanover County Courthouse, a crowd of supporters made up of family, friends, and other community members shouted “No justice, no peace!” and “What do we want? Justice! When do we want it? Now!”A friend of Farmer’s since childhood, who says he’s been a victim of police brutality, says he believes police need more training when it comes to dealing with the mentally ill.“They can buy drones and army tanks and guns, and body cams, but they can’t find enough money to help with the mental challenges that’s going on in this city,” Donald McKoy said. “If you look around, even downtown right here, you see all these people around here, homeless people, these are mentally ill people.”At a bond hearing in court, Farmer’s lawyer Micheal Littlejohn asked that his current $30,000 secured bond be made unsecured. The judge granted this, and a pre-trial release, on the condition that farmer live with his grandmother and undergo mental health treatment.“We’re happy that he’ll be able to get the treatment that he needs, and he can spend time with friends and family, and his support system behind me,” said Littlejohn. “And just for today, just being able to spend time with his mom on her birthday.”“We are elated, we are so happy,” said Farmer’s grandmother Mary Scott. “Hi’s a good boy, he’s a good man. And we are so glad he got good lawyers, and I thank God for them. God is good.”Farmer was ultimately ordered to be released on the condition that he live with his grandmother and undergo mental health treatment.Back in January, Farmer filed a lawsuit against law enforcement for excessive force.New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Lt. Jerry Brewer told us the use of force was necessary because Farmer bit a deputy.last_img read more