Month: September 2019

Month: September 2019

When Samuel Henry was a kid growing up in D.C. in the late 1950s, he and his friends were devoted Washington Redskins fans — they had the jerseys and knew the lore. And as the lore had it, the “reddish-brown tint” of paint on the team’s downtown D.C. headquarters came from the blood of Native Americans. “When I was a kid, me and my friends, we really thought that they had captured and killed Native Americans and pasted them all over the building,” Henry said. “We were just kids, we didn’t know any better. But we really, honestly believed that.”Now, almost 60 years later, the Redskins are enmeshed in a debate about whether their name is a racist epithet and should be changed. Advocates for keeping the name reference its origins: In 1937, owner George Preston Marshall changed the team name from the Braves to the Redskins. Marshall said the change was in honor of the head coach at the time, William Henry Dietz, who claimed to be part Sioux (although that claim is suspect). Critics including Henry say its origins are irrelevant and that the name is racist and demeaning. “I’d love to see a boycott of all things Redskins,” he said.Dan Snyder, the current owner, purchased the team in 1999, when it was fighting its first legal battle over the name. The lawsuits have continued, and earlier this year, the Trademark Trials and Appeal Board canceled the franchise trademark because “a substantial composite of Native Americans found the term Redskins to be disparaging.” Snyder has faced mounting pressure to change the name, even from President Obama and George Preston Marshall’s granddaughter. But Snyder plans to appeal the trademark decision and says he will “NEVER” change the name. Polling suggests Snyder has the backing to ignore the calls; most NFL fans (and Redskins fans in particular) oppose a name change.What’s considered an outrage in the NFL is embraced or at least tolerated all over the country. While we’ve been consumed by the debate about the Washington Redskins, we’ve overlooked thousands of team names and mascots depicting Native Americans, often stereotypically. These teams are not feeling the kind of pressure that Snyder is. To understand the Washington Redskins, we have to understand the Estelline Redmen, the Natick Redmen, and the Molalla Indians, too.Terry Borning, the proprietor of MascotDB, has kept a database of the nation’s mascots since 2006. He gathers his data from a variety of sources, including state high school athletic associations, websites and local newspapers. Borning’s database doesn’t have every high school, college and pro team in the country, but it does have 42,624 of them. Looking at MascotDB is as close as we can get to understanding how prevalent Native American team names and mascots are across the country. “There were a lot of interesting mascots where I lived growing up,” Borning said. “But those have mostly fallen by the wayside. Some of those things of the past were definitely offensive, but also more interesting than the generic mascots we have now.”I searched the database and found 2,129 sports teams that reference Braves, Chiefs, Indians, Orangemen, Raiders, Redmen, Reds, Redskins, Savages, Squaws, Tribe and Warriors, as well as tribe names such as Apaches, Arapahoe, Aztecs, Cherokees, Chickasaws, Chinooks, Chippewas, Choctaws, Comanches, Eskimos, Mohawks, Mohicans, Seminoles, Sioux and Utes. (Not all teams with the names “Raiders” and “Warriors” are referencing Native Americans, but we spot-checked 20 schools with each name and a majority of each did.)Some 92 percent of those 2,129 team names belong to high schools (the rest were college, semi-pro, pro and amateur league teams). Of all the active high schools in the database, 8.2 percent have Native American team names.I reached out to about a dozen of those high schools, and most didn’t want to comment on a controversy that hadn’t yet arrived. But the conversations I did have suggested that the way communities regard their teams’ Native American names and mascots depends on the makeup of the communities themselves.Estelline High, home of the Redmen, is located in a small town in South Dakota, 24 miles west of the Minnesota border. South Dakota has the third-largest Native American population share in the country, but Estelline hasn’t seen the kinds of protests directed at the Washington Redskins. The town has experienced little, if any, controversy over the Redmen name.The mascot dates back to sometime between 1915 and 1920, when a local newspaper referred to the Estelline athletic team by the color of its uniforms — “the men in red.” The name wasn’t officially adopted, but the team soon became known by its unofficial moniker, the Redmen. According to Estelline superintendent and high school principal Patrick Kraning, the association with Native Americans didn’t come until around 1930. Estelline followed with its own depiction of a “Redman” as a stereotype of a Native American chief wearing a headdress. Events such as the annual naming of a “Moon Princess” and “Big Chief” at homecoming became part of the tradition.“There’s been very little controversy over the team name,” Kraning said. “In the ’90s there was some discussion about changing the name for a series of schools [throughout southeastern South Dakota] that still referred to themselves as ‘Redmen.’ But in the end, a lot of us — Estelline included — decided to keep the name and just keep away from any Native American imagery associated with it.”Since then, the only symbol associated with the Estelline Redmen is a logo of an E with two feathers attached. Kraning believes that this change, combined with the fact that Estelline doesn’t have a significant Native American population, is why there hasn’t been much local debate on the topic.“There’s a community feeling that since the origin of the nickname was not a Native American reference, there’s not a desire for change,” he said. “If there were a discussion, most people would probably view it as going against 80 or 90 years of tradition.”Natick, Massachusetts, did go against tradition. In 2007, the school board dropped its high school mascot — also the “Redmen” — after an alumna of Native American descent came to the board and said she was offended by the activities surrounding the team she had experienced at Natick High School. The historian for the local Nipmuc tribe told me that the logo and mascot used by the school depicted a “stereotypical northern Native with a headdress,” but that depiction bore no resemblance to the actual indigenous people who lived in the Natick area. Nevertheless, protest groups soon sprouted up, claiming that the Natick Redmen honored Native Americans and were an important tradition.Soon after the change, school board meetings and a town-wide referendum turned the issue into a much broader discussion. The main critique came from the Redmen Forever Committee, a self-described grassroots effort that sought to influence the non-binding referendum. “We added a question to the referendum asking if townspeople wanted the Redmen name restored,” said Erich Thalheimer, co-founder of the Redmen Forever Committee. “It won overwhelmingly, but the school committee didn’t abide by the town’s wishes.”“If it were decided by popular vote, we would have the name,” said Anne Blanchard, a member of the Natick School Board. “But we had to take into account our nondiscrimination policy, as well as minority and majority interests.”The Redmen Forever Committee says it won’t give up the fight. “We chose the name of our committee very intentionally, very purposefully,” Thalheimer said. “This is our town. We’re going to live here until we die. We will forever try to re-establish the Redmen name.”While the controversy in Natick stemmed from a decision that affected one school, several states have taken a grievance from a single school and used it to forbid Native American mascots. One of the more sweeping bans so far was implemented with the help of Samuel Henry, the man who grew up earnestly believing that the Washington Redskins had painted their downtown D.C. headquarters with the blood of Native Americans. Henry is currently the chair of Oregon’s Board of Education, which instituted a statewide ban on Native American mascots and team names in 2012.The story goes back to 2006, when Che Butler, a member of the Siletz tribe and a student at Taft High School, raised the issue before the board. Butler said he was offended by the stereotypical and inauthentic manner in which the mascot of a rival school, the Molalla Indians, portrayed Native Americans. He and fellow Taft student Luhui Whitebear, a member of the Coastal Band of the Chumash Tribe, made a presentation at a board meeting asking for a statewide ban on mascots that “misrepresent” Native people, who instead “should be represented with true honor and respect.”According to Henry, the board agreed that “having Native American mascots did not seem like a good idea,” but decided to defer the decision.The grievance was taken up again six years later, when the director of public instruction decided to put it back on the board’s agenda. This time around, after some member turnover, the board agreed to ask its chief attorney to draft a proposal for a ban on the use of Native American mascots in public schools. The only dissenting vote came from a woman who claimed that it was too selective, and that devils and saints should be banned as well.As in Natick, one of the major arguments against the ban came from people who said that the mascots didn’t disparage Native Americans, but honored them. Many of these opponents knew little of Native American culture, Henry said. “I asked one of the students who made that argument what the name of the local Native American tribe was, and she didn’t know,” he said. “To me, that indicated that her reliance on saying that they were honoring Native Americans — that the support for that argument was pretty thin at best.”For high schools, a statewide ban is about as sweeping as it gets. Graduate to the next level, though, and schools have broader authorities to answer to. In 2005, the NCAA implemented its own de facto ban1The NCAA was careful not to implement an outright ban because the board didn’t feel it could. The language of the ban intentionally provided a lot of loopholes so that it didn’t infringe on schools’ institutional autonomy. on Native American mascots for all NCAA colleges.2In my survey of MascotDB, 4.9 percent of the Native American mascots and team names did belong to colleges, but almost all of those colleges did not belong to the NCAA. The ban focused on a specific list of schools whose mascots were deemed “hostile or abusive,” and precluded them from participating in postseason play if those nicknames or mascots appeared on any team uniforms or clothing.The NCAA had already taken a stand on a similar issue: the use of Confederate flags. In 2001, the organization banned arenas in South Carolina and Mississippi from hosting postseason championships because the Confederate flag flew proudly on their statehouse grounds. After that decision, the president of St. Cloud State University in Minnesota asked the NCAA to impose a ban on Native American mascots.The NCAA called on 18 schools (out of 1,046 total member schools at the time, or 1.7 percent) to drop their mascots.Not all of the targeted schools felt that their nicknames or mascots were “hostile or abusive,” and the ban was followed by a surge of criticism.“I must have gotten 2,000 emails from people just complaining about it,” the NCAA’s executive committee chairperson at the time, Walter Harrison, said. Even almost 10 years later, he still remembers one persistent caller. “He, or she, I don’t know if it was a man or a woman, would call my office phone at four in the morning and just play their school’s chant until the answering machine cut off,” he said.But the more serious backlash came in the form of appeals. One came from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and its Fighting Illini. The Fighting Illini were portrayed at halftime performances by a student dressed in full Lakota regalia, including face paint and a headdress. He went by the name “Chief Illiniwek,” and became the focus of the university’s fight against the ban.Controversy surrounding Chief Illiniwek predated the NCAA’s ruling by decades. The university’s board of trustees had been quietly in the process of considering a potential mascot change since 2001, and the publicity surrounding the nationwide ban reignited already-existing tension among students and alumni. Lawrence Eppley, who was the chair of the university’s board of trustees at the time, said he received hundreds of comments from foundations and alumni organizations threatening to withhold donations. He and the rest of the board figured the only option was to strike a compromise to keep both sides — passionate students and alumni and the NCAA — happy.Through its appeal, the school was allowed to keep its team name, but not its mascot. Chief Illiniwek portrayers, who had been a part of an official student organization called the Council of Chiefs, could continue the tradition as long as the group no longer had any official affiliation with the university. “One of the things that made it tough to retire it was making sure the fans knew that, if you loved the chief, that was nothing to feel guilty about,” Eppley said. “It’s just that times change, and there’s not much we can do about that.”Ivan Dozier, who currently portrays Chief Illiniwek, said that officially retiring the mascot was the wrong way for the university to respond. He believes that Native American mascots are a way to reach and educate an audience that wouldn’t normally be knowledgeable about Native American culture or history. “What concerns me is if you eliminate all references to Native American culture, people aren’t asking questions anymore,” he said. “Sports fans here are the vocal majority. They’re the ones who need this information the most, and now they have no way to go about getting it.”Eight of the schools on the NCAA’s list secured vocal support from local Native American tribes to successfully appeal and retain their team names and mascots. Eight others have changed their names and one dropped the use of a mascot entirely. Carthage College changed its team name from the Redmen to the Red Men and dropped all Native American imagery, which satisfied the NCAA’s requirements. Turning the Washington Redskins into the Red Skins is unlikely to appease the team’s critics, though. Given that the name is racist by definition and no tribe has come out in support of Snyder, it probably wouldn’t pass the NCAA’s grounds for appeal, and it certainly doesn’t pass in the court of Native American opinion.But even if the Redskins became the Red Skins or the Red Flyers or the Red Snyders, there would still be thousands of other teams that reference Native American imagery. Whatever happens with the Redskins, there will still be the Estelline Redmen, Chief Illiniwek, and the West Texas Comanches, each upholding the questionable legacy of Native American sports names. read more


Month: September 2019

ESPN was left with virtually no wiggle room. It had to discipline Rob Parker in some way for his misguided comments about Washington Redskins’ quarterback Robert Griffin III. And the network did, suspending him indefinitely.Meanwhile, Griffin practiced for the third straight day, sparking optimism that the dynamic rookie quarterback is recovering well from a mild knee sprain and could play Sunday in Cleveland against the Browns. The Redskins do not plan to make a decision on Griffin’s status until game time.The Redskins are in a battle for a playoff spot, making the outcome crucial. If the New York Giants lose to the 11-2 Atlanta Falcons and the Dallas Cowboys fall to the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Redskins win, they would bolt first place in the NFC East. Be certain Griffin is aware of this, and would want to go.There is a chance the team would hold him out if it believed he would risk further injury.Speaking of injury, Parker hurt his career. ESPN spokesman Josh Krulewitz said: “Following yesterday’s comments, Rob Parker has been suspended until further notice. We are conducting a full review.”In case you missed it, Parker, appearing on ESPN’s “First Take” on Thursday, was asked about Griffin’s role as a black quarterback. Parker proceeded to bury himself, questioning Griffin’s “blackness.” “Is he a brother or a cornball brother?” said Parker, who is black. “He’s black. . .But he’s not black. He’s not down with the cause.”He added: “We all know he has a white fiancée,” he said. “There was all this talk about he’s a Republican, which, there’s no information [about that] at all. I’m just trying to dig deeper as to why he has an issue. Because we did find out with Tiger Woods, Tiger Woods was like, I’ve got black skin, but don’t call me black. So people got to wondering about Tiger Woods early on.”Outrage ensued, particularly from the black community, which was offended that Parker would suggest an affable, engaging, humble athlete was not “black enough.”Robert Griffin II, the quarterback’s father, told USA Today Sports Thursday night : “I wouldn’t say it’s racism. I would just say some people put things out there about people so they can stir things up.”DeMaurice Smith, executive director of the NFL Players Association, told The Washington Post in an email Friday: “Robert can certainly take care of himself. Nonetheless, I hope that our men and for that matter, my own kids, will never beg for authenticity from someone who can only talk about the things that other people have the courage to do. People need to be held accountable for the offensive things that they say.” read more


Month: September 2019

200752+0.33+0.61+0.50+0.16+1.60 The underlying numbers support Mickelson’s 2018 renaissance. Using the strokes gained statistic — which evaluates every golfer by comparing his performance on each incremental shot in a round to the average — Mickelson is having the best season of his career on record, albeit in the early going. He is averaging +2.33 strokes gained per round, which is higher than his best full-season mark since at least 2004, the first year for which this data is available. 201659-0.15+0.73+0.22+0.57+1.36 201158+0.14+0.90+0.33-0.19+1.18 200859+0.40+0.84+0.36+0.21+1.82 201769-0.06+0.55+0.22+0.34+1.05 201357+0.02+0.49+0.26+0.66+1.44 Average Strokes Gained SeasonMeasured RoundsOff the TeeApproachAround the GreenPuttingTOTAL The entirety of the golf-watching internet has spent a couple of recent Sundays engrossed in a 40-something golfer whose career peaked a decade ago. But while Tiger Woods has consumed all of the oxygen in the room, the game’s other 40-something blast from the past, Phil Mickelson, is quietly playing some of the best golf of his professional career.That Mickelson, at the well-seasoned age of 47, is entirely overlooked thanks to his enigmatic rival is almost too fitting; it’s been happening for two decades.“He’s always one-upped me in my career, and I wouldn’t be surprised if he came out this week and won,” Mickelson said of Woods earlier this month. “Just to one-up me again.”Lefty stands at No. 18 in the World Golf Rankings, where the average age of the players ahead of him is 30.7. He is No. 3 in the FedExCup standings, where the average age of the players ahead of him is 28. He has logged five top-10 finishes in eight starts this season; only 31-year-old Brian Harman, who has played in 10 events, has more.At the WGC-Mexico Championship in early March, Mickelson beat Justin Thomas — the No. 2 golfer in the world, who is young enough to be Mickelson’s son — in a playoff. It was Mickelson’s 43rd professional win and his first since taking the British Open at Muirfield in 2013.It was also a continuation of peak performance this season from the avid gamesman. Entering this week’s WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play, Mickelson has finished no worse than tied for sixth at four consecutive tournaments. With an average finish of 3.5 over his past four appearances, Mickelson is currently riding the best four-event stretch of his entire career.1Excluding unofficial events, match play and team events. He’s placed in the top 15 in six of the eight tournaments this year, putting his average tournament finish this season on par with the best seasons of his career. 200948+0.31+0.27+0.38-0.15+0.82 200647+0.57+0.98+0.14+0.27+1.96 200550+0.34+0.57+0.36+0.26+1.53 201057+0.19+0.74+0.23-0.15+1.00 What’s gotten into Phil?How Phil Mickelson has fared in terms of strokes gained, 2004 season through March 20, 2018 201450+0.20+0.17+0.27+0.23+0.87 201260-0.10+0.57+0.40+0.56+1.42 201822-0.10+1.14+0.21+1.08+2.33 201555+0.07+0.02+0.23+0.26+0.58 2018 season is ongoing. Total average strokes gained may not add up exactly because of rounding.Source: PGA Tour 200454+0.60+0.60+0.22-0.09+1.32 As many a grandfather has implored over the years, golf is a sport people can play virtually their entire lives. But performance obviously diminishes over time — especially at the highest level the sport has to offer. There’s a senior tour for a reason, after all.So how, then, is Mickelson turning back the clock this season as the old-timer in a sea of youths?“There’s a number of areas in my game that, if I look back 10, 15 years ago, I feel like I’m significantly better,” Mickelson said earlier this month on the Dan Patrick Show. “Certainly, I’ve gotten a ton better at putting.”This is very true. Only Jason Day (1.39) is averaging more strokes gained with the putter than Mickelson (1.08), who leads the tour in the percentage of holes with only one putt (48.8 percent), the average number of putts per round (27), the percentage of holes with a birdie or better (41.3 percent)2On holes in which the player hit the green in regulation. and overall putting average (1.5 putts per hole).While his work off the tee has been nothing special (-0.10 strokes gained), Mickelson has had little difficulty getting his ball in position to attack the flagstick, ranking third in strokes gained on shots approaching the green (1.14).And yet, Mickelson’s odds to win the Masters sit at 20-to-1, below those of Woods, Jordan Spieth, Jason Day and Jon Rahm, who have combined to produce eight top-10 finishes and two wins this season. Mickelson has nearly matched those marks by himself. Given his record of work and meteoric ascension this season, golf’s most notorious active gambler would perhaps do well to bet on himself.Mickelson has publicly said one of his goals is to qualify for a 12th Ryder Cup and to help the U.S. team win on foreign soil. His recent win gives him a great chance of accomplishing it. Another goal is to eclipse 50 career wins on tour.“I don’t know (when I’ll get to 50),” Mickelson told reporters after his latest win. “Seven more wins and I’ll be there. I don’t have the month or the time, but I will get there.” read more


Month: September 2019

Fitzpatrick runs betterExpected points added on quarterback rushes quarterbackPer Pass PlayAiryards after catchSuccess Rate James Winston+0.22+0.82-0.6049.30% Atop their quarterback depth chart, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers have a 24-year-old former No. 1 overall pick who won the Heisman Trophy and was handed the keys to the franchise just a couple of years ago. Behind him, they have a 35-year-old journeyman — playing on his seventh team — who is most notable for going to Harvard and having a massive beard.This is not a team that’s supposed to have a quarterback controversy in Week 3. But that’s the reality in Tampa right now.Ryan Fitzpatrick has led the Buccaneers to a surprising 2-0 record to start the season, including wins at New Orleans and against reigning Super Bowl champion Philadelphia. He has been nothing short of brilliant filling in for the suspended Jameis Winston, throwing for 819 yards, eight touchdowns and just one interception. With Winston set to return from suspension after Week 3, Bucs head coach Dirk Koetter won’t commit to either player as his starter. Meanwhile, wide receiver DeSean Jackson is on the record saying that Fitzpatrick should keep his job when Winston returns, arguing that the Bucs need to ride the hot hand.Fitzpatrick’s hand has certainly been hot to open the season. His 13.4 yards per attempt leads the NFL, as does his 15.3 adjusted yards per attempt, a stat that incorporates touchdowns and interceptions. It’s the most dominant two-game start to a season1For a quarterback with at least 40 total attempts. since 1972, when Joe Namath threw for 14.5 yards per attempt and 15.7 adjusted yards per attempt in two wins for the Jets.Koetter and the Buccaneers will be faced with a difficult political environment in the locker room if they choose to bench Fitzpatrick in favor of Winston after Jackson’s comments. But what do the numbers say? Should Tampa Bay ride the hot hand or sit Fitzmagic and hand the team back over to Winston?We’ll start by comparing career numbers — they provide the largest sample size and the least noise. Winston has a career yards per attempt of 7.5, well above the league average of 7.1,2Since 2009. while Fitzpatrick is slightly below average at 6.8 yards per attempt. Both quarterbacks’ career touchdown rates are similar (4.5 percent for Winston vs. 4.4 percent for Fitzpatrick), as are their sack rates (5.8 percent for Winston vs. 5.4 percent for Fitzpatrick). Winston appears to take better care of the ball than Fitzpatrick does (2.8 percent interception rate for Winston vs. 3.3 for Fitzpatrick), but interception rate is a notoriously noisy stat, so drawing firm conclusions about who is truly better is difficult.These metrics lack context though. Perhaps a better way to compare their performances is using expected points added, which take into account down, distance and field position. Using the EPA model developed by Ron Yurko, Sam Ventura and Maksim Horowitz and play data from Elias Sports Bureau, I calculated the expected points added per pass play for both Winston over his career and Fitzpatrick since 2009.3The first year for which the data is available. I separated passing EPA into points added through the air and points added through yards after the catch. Finally, I calculated the percentage of passes that were positive EPA plays, also called success rate. Success rate is the share of plays in which a team picks up the yards needed to stay “on schedule” for a first down.4Which typically means gaining at least 4 yards on first down, 4 on second down and 2 on third down. Source: Elias Sports Bureau Winston’s passes are more effectiveExpected points added per pass — broken down by air yards and yards after catch — plus the success rate of each pass play Expected points added (epa) So while Winston is pretty clearly the better passer, there are legitimate reasons to prefer Fitzpatrick. The problem is that those reasons just aren’t terribly compelling. Having a 30-something QB — one who is not even known to be very fast — scramble for first downs is probably not going to be an integral part of the Tampa Bay game plan moving forward. Monken and Fitzpatrick have been great so far this season, but they’ve also been lucky. Passes that travel 25 or more yards downfield are worse than a 40 percent proposition across the league, and 95.7 percent of NFL passes go for less than 30 yards in the air. Optimizing for rare plays with a low probability of being caught probably isn’t wise.Finally, the way a quarterback plays in his first two games has almost no bearing on how he will perform over the rest of the season. (Sorry, Patrick Mahomes.) Using game-level passing data from Armchair Analysis from 2000 through 2017, I looked at how well a quarterback’s yards per attempt in the first two games of the season matched his rest-of-season numbers, and the first two games weren’t predictive.6Yards per attempt in a player’s first two games explains just 8 percent of the variance in the player’s rest of season yards per attempt. R-squared 0.082, n = 766 player seasons Basing your decisions on a two-game sample at the start of the year is deeply unwise, hot hand or not.The Buccaneers have one more week to evaluate Fitzpatrick’s play — and so will America, as Tampa takes on Pittsburgh in Monday Night Football. If Fitzpatrick has a poor game, it will likely make it easier for Koetter to decide to play Winston in Week 4. If Fitzpatrick has another solid game, there will likely be grousing in the locker room if he’s taken off the field, but it’s very likely the correct decision. Monken has shown the ability and creativity to maximize the talents of his players, and the Tampa Bay receiving weapons will be best served in the long run by having Winston under center.Check out our latest NFL predictions. We can also see that across most other depths of target, Winston is the superior passer, consistent with our previous metrics. Still, Monken has been smart with Fitzpatrick, calling deep plays early that take advantage of Fitzpatrick’s strengths, and it has paid off handsomely.Another area in which Fitzpatrick is superior to Winston is an unexpected one: QB scrambles. Despite being 10 years older, the journeyman completely outclasses the youngster when pulling the ball down and running. Jameis Winston-0.01 quarterbackRush EPA As a passer, Winston is worth almost twice as many points per play as Fitzpatrick is, and Winston is 4.2 percentage points more successful at keeping his team on the field with his arm. And while EPA per play from yards after the catch is negative for both players, Fitzpatrick has probably been helped more by his receivers than Winston has.In each of the first two games of the season, Tampa Bay offensive coordinator Todd Monken dialed up a deep pass attempt early. On the fourth offensive play of the game against New Orleans, Fitzpatrick threw the ball 38 yards in the air to DeSean Jackson, who then ran 20 yards after the catch for a touchdown. On the first offensive play of the game against the Eagles in Week 2, Fitzpatrick completed another long pass — 35 yards deep to Jackson, who then rumbled 40 yards after the catch, again for a TD. Those two plays account for two of Fitzpatrick’s eight touchdowns and 16 percent of his passing yardage on the year — and 45 percent of those yards were Jackson running after the catch.Apportioning credit for yards in football is notoriously difficult. If we plot Fitzpatrick’s career completion percentage by depth on plays in which he faced no pressure5Work by Eric Eager has shown that QB performance from a clean pocket is more stable and predictive of future performance than when a QB is pressured. and compare it with both Jameis Winston and the league average, we can see that Fitzpatrick is actually quite good on deeper throws. Ryan Fitzpatrick+0.16 Source: Elias Sports Bureau Ryan Fitzpatrick+0.12+0.60-0.4945.10 read more


Month: September 2019

Logan Stieber took home a national championship title for the second year in a row as the Ohio State wrestling team earned sixth place out of 10 teams at the NCAA Championships over the weekend. The Buckeyes, who tallied 59.5 points, finished behind Penn State (123.5), Oklahoma State (119.5), Minnesota (103), Iowa (73) and Cornell (65). The Nittany Lions’ national title is their third in a row. Redshirt sophomore Stieber, of the 133-pound weight class, was the star of the tournament for OSU. Stieber, the No. 1 seed, capped off a perfect season, 27-0, with his defeat of Iowa redshirt junior and No. 2-seeded Tony Ramos 7-4. In the pair’s last meeting at the Big Ten Championship finals on March 10, Stieber took down Ramos, 3-1, in a sudden victory. But the wins are nothing out of the ordinary: lifetime, Stieber is 5-0 against the Hawkeye. “I was able to get into my offense early and open the match up against Ramos,” Stieber said in a press release. “That was the difference this time.” Stieber’s brother, sophomore Hunter Stieber, finished third in the 141-pound class. In Hunter Stieber’s semifinals match, the No. 1 seed suffered a narrow 7-6 loss to Edinboro’s Mitchell Port before earning consecutive victories over Cornell’s Michael Nevinger (9-0) and the Citadel’s Ugi Khishignyam (12-4). Overall, Hunter Stieber finished his second All-American season with an impressive 36-1 record. Fellow two-time All-American and redshirt junior Nick Heflin finished fifth in the tournament at 174 pounds. After being defeated by Minnesota’s Logan Storley, 3-2, Heflin was sent to the fifth-place bout to face-off with Iowa’s Michael Evans. In their previous matchup on Jan. 4, Evans beat Heflin in a 9-4 sudden victory. However, the story was different this time as Heflin pinned his opponent in 2:10 to earn the win. He concluded his season with a 20-7 record. Senior Nikko Triggas (125 pounds), redshirt senior C.J. Magrum (184), redshirt sophomore Josh Demas (157) and freshman Mark Martin (165) were all eliminated on the second day of the tournament. Redshirt junior Ian Paddock (149) and sophomore Andrew Campolattano (197) were eliminated on the tournament’s first day. The championships were held at Wells Fargo Arena in Des Moines, Iowa. read more


Month: September 2019

OSU redshirt sophomore center Trevor Thompson (32) during a game against Maryland on Jan. 31 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU lost 66-61. Credit: Muyao Shen | Asst. Photo EditorOhio State redshirt junior center Trevor Thompson signed with agent Thad Foucher of the Wasserman Group on Tuesday, as first reported by Jeff Goodman.Former Ohio State big man Trevor Thompson told ESPN he has signed with Thad Foucher of the Wasserman Group.— Jeff Goodman (@GoodmanESPN) April 26, 2017The decision by Thompson to sign with an agent officially means that he will not be returning to OSU for his senior season. He had declared his intentions to enter the 2017 NBA draft on March 14.Last season with the Buckeyes, Thompson averaged 10.6 points, 9.2 rebounds and 1.5 blocks per game. The Buckeyes will now have to find a new starting center between sophomore Micah Potter and incoming freshman Kaleb Wesson. read more


Month: September 2019

Ohio State then-sophomore forward Tanner Laczynski (9) scores a goal in front of the net against Wisconsin senior goalie Kyle Hayton (33) in the third period on Friday, Feb. 23, 2018 at the Schottenstein Center in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio State won the game 6-2. Credit: Wyatt Crosher | Lantern ReporterWith strong goaltending and good production on offense, the No. 7 Ohio State men’s hockey team took both games against Colgate for its second sweep of the season.Ohio State (6-3-1, 1-1 B1G) shutout the Colgate Raiders (2-6-1, 0-1-1 ECAC) in its game Friday night 3-0, keeping the scoreless streak going Saturday with a 1-0 win.Game 1After missing both games against Notre Dame, junior forward Tanner Laczynski returned to the lineup for the Buckeyes against Colgate on the third line and scored two goals to help lead Ohio State to victory.The Buckeyes survived an early Colgate power play before junior forward Ronnie Hein scored the team’s first goal. He was assisted by freshman forward Gustaf Westlund, his fourth assist of the season. In the second period, Ohio State failed to convert on both of its power play opportunities. Overall, Ohio State was 0-4 with the man advantage and Colgate didn’t score on its only power play of the night. Laczynski scored the next goal for Ohio State, his third of the season, with less than 20 seconds remaining in the second period.The third period was scoreless until Laczynski added the third Ohio State goal,his fourth of the season, in the empty net with less than 20 seconds remaining in the game.Redshirt senior goaltender Sean Romeo stopped every one of the 19 shots sent his way in his second straight shutout, the fourth of his career. Romeo hasn’t allowed a goal in his last two games where he has faced 42 combined shots. The Buckeyes outshot Colgate 44-19, their most shots on goal this season.Game 2Ohio State’s offense was balanced in its win against Colgate on Friday, scoring once in each period. While the Buckeyes weren’t scoring as often Saturday night, a late goal still allowed Ohio State to come away with the series sweep.The nets were untouched through the first two periods of the game, with Ohio State outshooting Colgate 23-18 through the first 40 minutes. In the third period, however, the Buckeyes ramped up their shooting as time ticked away, outshooting the Raiders 13-6 in the final period and 36-24 overall.Senior forward Dakota Joshua scored the only goal of the game with less than 10 minutes remaining in the third period and was assisted by senior forwards John Wiitala and Brendon Kearney. The power play was a struggle for both teams on Saturday, as neither team could convert on any of the four power play attempts they were given. Though Ohio State has struggled offensively on the power play, the penalty kill has slowly improved. The Buckeyes are now killing 80 percent of the penalties they are facing, only allowing eight all season, and they haven’t given one up since their 2-2 tie at Bowling Green in October.Sophomore goaltender Tommy Nappier provided the second shutout of the series and his second of the season, saving all 24 shots he faced.This is the first series that Ohio State has shutout its opponent in both games since they played UAH in Nov. 2011.No. 7 Ohio State will return to Columbus next weekend to take on the No. 20 Wisconsin Badgers. read more


Month: September 2019

first_imgIn almost all cases, passengers were standing in standard class carriages, which seat 80 people each.The new franchise, which will begin in December 2018, could see the introduction of high capacity metro-style carriages on the busiest lines.It is hoped they would enable a “better balance” of seating and room for standing passengers, space for wheelchairs and pushchairs on shorter journeys and quicker boarding and alighting at stations.Extending the number of carriages on stopping services from eight or 10 to 12 carriages and providing more seats on high speed services is also being considered.Some 640,000 journeys are made on 1,900 trains on the lines every weekday, yet only 77 per cent of passengers are satisfied with Southeastern services according to the latest Transport Focus survey, the worst performance in Britain apart from Southern and Thameslink. Government officials are examining a number of measures which could have a negative impact on some passengers.They are proposing a reduction in the number of trains that call at some less well-used stations to cut journey times to key locations, and a limit in the choice of central London destinations from individual stations with the aim of providing a more regular and reliable service.The operator which secures the franchise will be required to form an alliance with Network Rail, which is responsible for railway infrastructure.Chris Grayling, the Transport Secretary, said: “Services on the South Eastern rail network have been unacceptably poor for far too long.”Passengers have endured disruption, overcrowding and delays, particularly during redevelopment work at London Bridge station, and they deserve better.”That is why this consultation is so important. Appointing a new franchise operator from 2018 provides us with a great opportunity to sort out the problems which have plagued the South Eastern network, and deliver the high quality of service that customers expect.”We are going to do things differently. I want passengers to enjoy more space and comfort, more and better communication with the operator, and a consistently reliable performance.”Mr Grayling announced in December that he would not devolve responsibility for the South Eastern franchise to London’s Labour Mayor Sadiq Khan.He claimed Transport for London’s business plan did not offer extra capacity and was simply based on “a belief” that the organisation could run the system more effectively.But Mr Grayling was accused of putting politics ahead of passengers over the issue after a leaked letter showed he opposed the policy in 2013 as he wanted to keep the network “out of the clutches” of any future Labour mayor. First class carriages on busy trains should removed to ease overcrowding, the Department for Transport The DfT consultation closes on May 23 and a summary report will be published in September this year. The DfT acknowledged that first class seats “remain popular on certain routes” such as the main line to Sevenoaks, Tonbridge and Tunbridge Wells, but said removing them would “create more room for passengers”.center_img First class carriages on busy trains should be removed to ease overcrowding, the Department for Transport  (DfT) has suggested following a Telegraph investigation.Services could be made entirely standard class under a new franchise agreement for routes currently operated by Southeastern, as part of measures the DfT are considering in a public consultation.The DfT’s recommendations follows a Telegraph investigation which found that many first class carriages remain half-empty even in rush hours.The research, commissioned by The Telegraph in 2013, involved intercity trains arriving at Paddington, Waterloo, Liverpool Street and Kings Cross between 8am and 9am on three consecutive weekdays.Trains typically had three first-class carriages and five in standard class. Less than a fifth of the first-class carriages were full or nearly full, and some had only three or four people in carriages with 48 seats. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. First class carriages on busy trains should removed to ease overcrowding, the Department for TransportCredit:AFP/Getty Imageslast_img read more


Month: September 2019

first_imgPippa McManus and dog “The tear in the thread of our family will never be mended. Pip spent her last three years fighting against against anorexia, malnutrition, depression and self-harm.”Too many of our children are dying from this terrible illness [anorexia]. Effective treatment is needed more quickly, and if this had been available to out beautiful daughter, maybe she would still be alive today.”The teenager’s father, Jim McManus, said his daughter had been “failed” and describe some of the care she had received as “quite disturbing”.“It’s not the ending we want, however the jury came up with the right answers,” he said.”It was quite deflating to see all the hard, goodwill, for her to build her weight back up – she desperately wanted to get her life back on track – and the illness would suddenly, at a flick of a finger, pull her back down to earth again.”It wasn’t pleasant at all. She was a lovely girl, plenty of fun. Always active.”Paula Stanford, Hospital Director of the Priory Hospital Altrincham, said: “Our heartfelt sympathies are with Pip’s family and we will now carefully consider the findings of the jury.” The tear in the thread of our family will never be mendedMarie McManus The jury criticised the planning for her discharge, and found there was “inadequate engagement of community support” for Pip’s family and a “failure to implement a care plan in a timely manner”.They did not, however, criticise the decision to release her itself.The Priory is one of the UK’s largest mental health providers and has multi-million pound contracts with the NHS.Last year the mother of 14-year-old Amy El-Keria, who died from neglect at a Priory facility, to lose the contracts. Pippa’s parents believe she would be alive but for care failingsCredit:MEN The court found staff at The Priory Hospital Altrincham had developed “no relationship” with people who could have help safeguard the teen once she was released, despite having cared for her for a year.Yesterday her parents said failings in their daughter’s care were “quite disturbing” and had been responsible for her death.Following the argument in 2015, Pippa walked away from the family home in Frances Avenue to Gatley station, where she stepped in front of a train. The Priory released a severely anorexic teenage girl without telling her parents she was at risk of suicide five days before she walked in front of a train.An inquest into the death of 15-year-old Pippa McManus found the private hospital also failed to organise proper aftercare for the teenager, who took her own life.A jury at stockport Coroner’s court heard how on the day she died, Pippa had argued with her family over excessive use of the gym and warned she was going to kill herself. Speaking outside court, Pippa’s mother Marie said: “We believe the failings of our daughter’s care, from beginning to end, resulted in her death. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more


Month: September 2019

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Officially the Labour Candidate for Aberconwy – nomination papers in at Bodlondeb today! pic.twitter.com/JKj4hfMVd8— Emily Owen (@Emily4Aberconwy) 11 May 2017 “Those posting the abuse are cowards, as they hide behind stupid names and funnily enough nobody ever says anything like that on the doorstep when I go around knocking on doors.”“I’m sure Guto Bebb (the defending Tory MP) isn’t getting this kind of abuse simply because he’s not a young woman standing.” Standing firm for Aberconwy! pic.twitter.com/rBAQfmXntM— Emily Owen (@Emily4Aberconwy) 14 May 2017 “I highly doubt you’ll be asking the male candidates their penis size in order to make a decision about their politics….. sexism is not okay. ”Speaking to the Daily Post, Ms Owen said: “I decided to say something on social media as sexism like this just isn’t acceptable. It’s totally depressing that this sort of thing is still going on in 2017.” Emily Owen, standing for election as the Labour Party candidate in Aberconwy, has been on the receiving end of a huge amount of sexual harassment on social media since announcing her candidacy. Ms Owen, 22, highlighted the abuse with a message on Twitter: “Let’s discuss politics, not my breasts.”The Labour candidate, who is standing against Guto Bebb, Conservative MP for Aberconwy since 2010, has received messages commenting on her physical appearance and her breast size, with one man contacting her  to say: “How many votes for a striptease?”In a post on her Facebook page MsOwen said: “This is the first time I’ve been under this level of public scrutiny and I have to say I’m shocked! “If people have questions about my politics, discuss with me. If you don’t agree with my reply, challenge me.“What is not acceptable is flooding me with messages about what sexual acts I’m prepared to perform to get votes, what bra size I am, how many votes needed for me to strip and comments suggesting the reason I’m standing is to sleep with an Oxford grad.“I’ve been debating ignoring it but this behaviour is disgusting and needs calling out!!!last_img read more