Week emphasizes theme of accountability for campus issues

Tag: 夜上海论坛KJ

first_imgStudent government and the Gender Relations Center (GRC) are partnering to host the “Cost of Silence” week. Formerly known as “Race Relations Week,” sophomore Kaleem Minor, student government director of diversity and inclusion, said the new title was meant to encompass more issues on campus.“We feel like something bigger on this campus is what it means to be silent for your friend, what it means to not be an ally,” Minor said. “What’s the cost [of] that? And not just allyship, but being accountable, being involved with the issue. Because this issue is not something that one person, one group, one organization can fix. It’s something that everybody has to chip in and help [solve].”The week includes events such as apparel handouts, T-shirt distributions, a screening of the film “Sisters of Selma: Bearing Witness for Change,” a pledge signing and a speaker series.“We’re trying to encourage people to know their role, understand their role and figure out their role,” Minor said. “While our University’s great, there’s a lot of things that aren’t great for … students that aren’t a majority in any sense — whether it be race, sexual orientation, religion, socioeconomic status and gender identity.”Minor said his department — diversity and inclusion — put a lot of thought into the week’s events to make sure they were as successful as possible. He said they focused on events that would engage students and incite discussion, not just through the panels, but from events as simple as T-shirt distributions. The T-shirts advertise statistics on women’s rights, race and sexual identity, among others.The event Minor said he is most excited about is the speaker series.“The goal of this event and the reason I’m so excited about it is because you have these people who are experts in this field and understand what’s going on, talking to students and challenging students to get involved,” he said.The goal of the week, Minor said, is to get students thinking about how to act on the issues they care about the most.“A lot of students, from what I’ve heard, they want to change campus but they don’t know how,” he said. “We just talk about what they care about and why they care about it and encourage them to get involved … in any way because everybody has a role. “The general arching theme is accountability. How can you get involved? How can you change campus?”Minor said he remembers last year, his freshman year, when campus was especially hostile during election season.“I think now there’s an aura of being cordial, but not necessarily talking or having conversations,” he said. “I think there’s a deep and thorough need for that under the right circumstances, which is something we all have to come together and decide how to do.”In terms of racial relations and inclusion on campus, Minor said, there is definitely room for improvement. He said this week empowers students to bring up the issues they most care about. He said in conjunction with the GRC, student government hosts this week to serve as a platform for students to voice their opinions on how to make this University a more welcoming place for all, without exceptions.“We have some really powerful events [this week] that can really provoke some thought and discussion,” he said. “If we can get 20-25 people … to say, ‘Wow, I have an issue that I really care about and I want to get involved in fixing this’ … that’s a win to me.”Tags: Accountability, Cost of Silence, Diversity, Diversity and Inclusion, inclusion, Race relationslast_img read more


Tag: 夜上海论坛KJ

first_img Press Association For most of the last furlong there appeared to be a big shock on the cards after Karl Burke’s Toocoolforschool shook off market leader Basateen, but William Buick played his hand last of all aboard the winner. The judge called a photo-finish but Dutch Connection (16-1) beat the 33-1 chance by a head, with Basateen third. Buick said: “It was a good race, a step up from anything he’s done in the past. He tries very hard and he’s uncomplicated, which is a great attribute for a two-year-old.” Winning trainer Charlie Hills said: “He has been improving mentally all year. He’s such an honest horse. He really ground it out. We won’t be rushing him out on to the track too soon, we’ll probably give him one more run.” Hills will now consider sending Dutch Connection to France or Newmarket, and said: “He’s still a big frame of a horse and he’ll get a mile, but I don’t think I want to be doing that yet. He’s in the Jean-Luc Lagardere and the Dewhurst, it’ll be that sort of thing.” Burke said of the runner-up: “We thought a lot of him, that’s why we came here. I did think he was better than the handicapper said, but he has still exceeded my expectations there. He’s quite gawky, and perhaps he was just in front 100 yards too soon but he has run a great race and we know he belongs in this company now.” Aidan O’Brien’s Galileo colt was an impressive winner at the Galway Festival and was sent off 2-1 second-favourite for this Group Three contest. He raced prominently in the hands of Joseph O’Brien but lacked a change of gear at the business end and plugged on at the one pace. center_img Jamaica had to settle for fourth as Dutch Connection caused a minor surprise in the Tattersalls Acomb Stakes at York.last_img read more


Tag: 夜上海论坛KJ

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE‘Mame,’ ‘Hello, Dolly!’ composer Jerry Herman dies at 88160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! BURBANK – It’s fairly common for City Council meetings to drag on for hours, but the marathon session that started at 5 p.m. Feb. 28 broke some kind of record. It was 2:46 a.m. on March 1 before the council adjourned after listening to nearly three dozen people speak about the city’s hedge ordinance and 20 more comment about other agenda items. “I was just plain old tired,” Burbank Mayor Jef Vander Borght said. “When you get past midnight, I think you’re getting into unreasonableness.” Conscious of the strain that long meetings put on the public – and themselves – City Council members are considering ways to shorten future sessions. Proposals include imposing deadlines for taking public comment cards, allowing comments only on city business, and setting aside a 20-minute block for those who want to talk about neighborhood concerns. “There are people who have made it their livelihood to come to the council and weigh in on every single issue,” Vander Borght said. “At that point their input loses value. The question is, whose time is being wasted?” But some residents say it would be a disservice to Burbank’s residents to limit the public comment period. “The City Council needs to manage their time and their agendas better,” said Carolyn Berlin, a former Planning Board member, who regularly attends council meetings. “Rather than having very, very late meetings, perhaps they should have a special meeting to catch up, rather than cutting the public’s comment time. They need to seriously look at balancing everyone’s needs.” Raphe Sonenshein, a political science professor at California State University, Fullerton, said many cities are struggling to shorten their meetings while still complying with provisions of the Ralph M. Brown Act, the state’s public meetings law. For example, cities can set rules limiting comment periods and even the tone of comments, Sonenshein said. “In a number of cities, the issue is to make sure that the work of the council gets done in a reasonable amount of time,” said Sonenshein, who has worked with Los Angeles to reform its City Charter, and is now working with Burbank on a similar review. “It’s a real legitimate question. And to a certain degree, you would have to assume that the city can find a way to not overwhelm everybody with the length of the meetings, and that meetings be effective, and that everybody gets to get heard,” he said. “It’s not impossible to do.” Residents get four opportunities to address Burbank’s five-member council, whose members serve part-time: three minutes each on closed-session items; two minutes each on city business; four minutes each on agenda items; and two minutes each near the end of the meeting on city business. “I think we have to manage the time better. I want to avoid wasting people’s time unnecessarily,” Vander Borght said. Jason Kandel, (818) 546-3306 jason.kandel@dailynews.comlast_img read more