Incoming Editor-in-Chief announces editors

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first_imgTags: Editors Six new editors will join The Observer’s Editorial Board in 2014-15 and one current editor will retain her spot, incoming Editor-in-Chief Ann Marie Jakubowski announced Friday.Sophomores Lesley Stevenson, Mary Green, Wei Lin and Gabriela Leskur and juniors Allie Tollaksen and Keri O’Mara will assume positions on the Editorial Board after Spring Break. Junior Kelly Konya will continue as Saint Mary’s Editor, no longer interim.Stevenson, a resident of Breen-Phillips Hall and native of Memphis, Tenn., will serve as News Editor. Majoring in film, television and theatre with a minor in journalism, ethics and democracy, Stevenson joined The Observer in fall 2012 and has since covered this year’s ND Forum on Women in Leadership and the 2014 student government election.Green hails from Tampa, Fla., and lives in Pangborn Hall. She majors in film, television and theatre and English, with a minor in journalism, ethics and democracy. Green will serve as Sports Editor after covering women’s basketball and men’s swimming and spending the past year as Interhall Editor.Lin, a resident of Knott Hall and native of New York, will serve as Photo Editor. He majors in accounting, economics and Chinese and joined The Observer as a photographer in November 2012. He became a nightly photo editor in March 2013 and also writes for the News department intermittently.Leskur will take over as Viewpoint Editor. A native of Cleveland, and resident of Farley Hall, she majors in the Program of Liberal Studies with an anthropology minor. Leskur currently writes for The Observer’s Scene Department, including a popular recurring column titled “Gabriela’s Double Dog Dare.”Tollaksen, from Racine, Wis., majors in psychology and minors in poverty studies. The Farley Hall resident will be Scene Editor after joining the staff last year and serving as Associate Scene Editor this semester.O’Mara, a resident of Welsh Family Hall, will serve as Graphics Editor. Hailing from Albany, N.Y., she majors in graphic design and minors in peace studies. O’Mara has done design work for the Arts and Letters Office of Communication, Scholastic Magazine, Junior Class Council and the student peace conference.Konya will continue as Saint Mary’s Editor. The Le Mans Hall resident and Twinsburg, Ohio, native majors in English writing and English literature and has experience as Associate Saint Mary’s Editor last semester and current interim editor.last_img read more


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first_imgMANDAN, N.D. – Kupper Chevrolet has again renewed its contract as title sponsor for the Dakota Classic Tour for IMCA Modifieds and IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars. “We are proud to support local dirt track racing in our community and thrilled to once again sign on as the title sponsor of the Dakota Classic Modified Tour,” said Kupper Chevrolet owner Bob Kupper.   In addition, more than $20,000 in contingency prizes and hard charger awards will be awarded from some of the top racing manufacturers and retailers in the US and Canada.  This latest extension marks the third time the Mandan, N.D.-based Chevrolet dealership has re­newed its three-year sponsorship that furnishes point fund moneys for both divisions, along with individual track support for the series.  On Friday, July 12, Dacotah Speedway also hosts the Corral Sales Legendary 50 that pays $10,004 to win the IMCA Modified feature.  Entries will be taken online starting on or about June 1 at www.dakotamodtour.com. All tour races will be broadcast live by IMCA-TV.  “Kupper’s sponsorship is a significant reason why the tour pays its large nightly purse that attracts the very best drivers from the continent,” noted Director John Gartner. center_img The Kupper’s point fund for the Modifieds will pay out $2,000 for the top 10 in series points. In the Stock Car division $1,000 is paid out to the top 10 in points.  Now in its 30th year, the tour is series starts at Jamestown Speedway on Saturday, July 6 with dates following Sunday, July 7 at Nodak Speedway in Minot, Monday, July 8 at Estevan Motor Speedway, Tuesday, July 9 at Williston Basin Speedway, Wednesday, July 10 at Southwest Speed­way in Dickinson and championship night Thursday, July 11 at Dacotah Speedway in Man­dan.  All Modified features are Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot qualifying events, as is the Legend­ary 50.  The Kupper Chevrolet Dakota Classic Tour will pay all IMCA Modified feature winners $2,400, with $300 to start the 30-lap feature. IMCA Sunoco Stock Car winners receive $800 and $100 to start their 25-lap features.  Any questions can be directed to Gartner at 701 202-6075 or by email at johnygman@bis.midco.net.last_img read more


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first_imgRelated posts:US Coast Guard to assist in investigation of deadly catamaran accident Investigation finds ‘no negligence’ in deadly Costa Rica catamaran accident  US tourist rescued at sea in southern Pacific Fishermen, locals are the ‘real heroes’ in Costa Rica catamaran accident, says survivor Nearly five months after the catamaran Pura Vida Princesscapsized off Costa Rica’s central Pacific coast with more than 100 people on board, the investigation into the accident that killed three foreign tourists remains ongoing. Survivors have been waiting for the National Insurance Institute (INS) to process their claims, and a recent attempt to inspect the wreckage of the day cruiser came up short.The Pura Vida Princess, owned by Global Crust Firm S.A., left Herradura Bay on Jan. 8 on its way across the Gulf of Nicoya for a day trip to Tortuga Island. Reports said that the sea was calm when the vessel set sail, but within 30 minutes the catamaran found itself in rough seas with waves as high as 2 meters and winds up to 45 knots, according to a statement from the U.S. Embassy in San José.Before the ship’s captain could return to port, the catamaran started taking on water. The ship tipped on its starboard side and capsized, killing three passengers from Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States.Todd Olson, 51, of Shawnee, Kansas, was on board with his wife, Connie, and their two children, Carley and Derec, when the catamaran went down.“I must admit feeling frustrated and angry watching from a distance what appears to be a half-assed effort to investigate the accident,” Olson told The Tico Times in an email.Olson sustained a shoulder injury when the ship capsized, an accident that changed his life, he said. He went back to work after he returned to the United States but the physical demands of his job as an animal and pest control specialist became too much after his injury. After 16 years in the profession, Olson left his career behind. In April, Olson underwent surgery for a torn labrum and rotater cuff, and a ruptured bicep tendon.He has been able to find work since but he had to take a pay cut that has significantly affected his family’s finances, he said. Olson estimated his family’s losses from the accident at $15,000. The family submitted their insurance claim to INS but has yet to hear anything.Susan Shonk, another survivor who previously spoke with The Tico Times about her ordeal during and after the Pura Vida Princess sank, said in an email that she, too, is still waiting for word from INS on her family’s claims. Shonk added that she had been interviewed by the National Transportation Safety Board, or NTSB, in the U.S.A statement from the INS Operations Department to The Tico Times said that details about the status of the Pura Vida Princess insurance claims are confidential. The agency did not comment further.The U.S. Coast Guard and NTSB were in Costa Rica from April 12 to April 22 to assist Costa Rican authorities with the investigation.A U.S. Coast Guard dive team traveled to Costa Rica to find the site of the shipwreck. After searching an area over 2 square miles of the suspected site, divers and an unmanned submersible were unable to get a visual of the catamaran, according to a statement from the U.S. Embassy in San José and comments from Costa Rican Coast Guard Director Martin Arias to the daily La Nación. The U.S. Coast Guard team did identify an object on the sea floor with a sonar signal that matched the characteristics of the catamaran.The U.S. Coast Guard and NTSB, at the request of the Costa Rican government, have also been working with local authorities to review safety and regulatory protocols.A spokeswoman for Costa Rica’s Judicial Investigation Police (OIJ), Xinia Zamora, told The Tico Times that the OIJ would not comment on the ongoing investigation or what the next steps would be after divers were unable to reach the shipwreck. The Prosecutor’s Office also did not comment on the investigation, saying they are waiting for a final report from the OIJ.Prosecutor’s Office spokeswoman Tatiana Vargas previously told this newspaper that no charges would be filed until the OIJ report was complete.A final report on the cause of the capsizing is expected sometime this fall. Facebook Commentslast_img read more