Hypatia Day to promote women in STEM

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first_imgCourtesy of Gwen O’Brien Saint Mary’s will host the 23rd annual Hypatia Day this Saturday, a day for middle school girls to be inspired by the realms of math and science.Saint Mary’s will host the 23rd annual Hypatia Day this Saturday for seventh grade girls from local South Bend schools to fight the stereotype that math and science are male-dominated fields. With the assistance of current students, professors and high school students, the day will be centered around exposing both young girls and their parents to the many opportunities available in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) fields for women.Hypatia Day was first organized in 1991 by Sr. Miriam Patrick Cooney, professor emerita of mathematics, director of media relations Gwen O’Brien said.Hypatia Day is named for the first known female mathematician, Hypatia of Alexandria, who was the daughter of ancient Greek mathematician and philosopher Theon, O’Brien said. According to legend, Hypatia’s father taught her mathematics during a period in Greek history when young girls were excluded from education.According to Socrates, Hypatia’s home and lecture room were the two favorite gathering places for her scholarly friends, as she was one of the most-loved teachers and well-respected scholars of her time.Assistant professor of mathematics Kristin Kuter said Hypatia Day is mainly geared towards seventh grade girls and their parents.Some of the participating schools include Indiana schools such as Boston Middle School in La Porte, Discovery Middle School in Granger, Grissom Middle School in Mishawaka, Lincoln Jr. High in Plymouth, New Prairie Middle School in New Carlisle and St. Joseph Grade School in South Bend.“The focus of the event is to encourage the seventh graders to continue to pursue an education in math and science, while informing their parents on how to support their daughters in that goal,” Kuter said.Kuter said this year’s Hypatia Day will feature hands-on activities run by STEM-related clubs on campus.“This year we have sessions organized by the biology, chemistry, engineering, math and computer science, nursing and physics clubs,” Kuter said. “During these sessions, the seventh graders will interact with college women preparing for careers in the STEM fields and will be encouraged to view one another as potential physicians, research scientists, actuaries, engineers, statisticians, data analysts, technology experts and the like.”Beginning at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, students and their parents will arrive in Carroll Auditorium for a welcome presentation by Kuter. Then, director of patient logistics at University of Chicago Medicine Emily Lowder will deliver the keynote address, “Following Their Footsteps and Tales from the Journey” to all participants.Kuter said throughout the day, middle school students will have the opportunity to work in the lab with college and high school students who are preparing for a future in the STEM fields. Kuter said parents will also be able to speak with Saint Mary’s students about their future careers, attend panel discussions and take part in campus tours.“The parents attend a panel discussion focusing on what curriculum best prepares a student for college and keeps all of her options open. Another session will provide information on financial preparation for a college education,” she said.Kuter said she believes Hypatia Day is important not only for young girls at their current age, but for the growth of their interest in the subjects over time.“This event is important to the community because research has shown that girls of this age greatly benefit from extra attention and encouragement for their interest in studies which require a high degree of training in mathematics and science,” Kuter said.Senior Audrey Kiefer said she believes Hypatia Day to be one of the best ways Saint Mary’s can engage with the local community.“Though I haven’t participated in the day personally, I know some of my fellow classmates who are science majors always say that the young girls truly appreciate the opportunity to experiment in the labs and make connections with college students,” Kiefer said.Kiefer said she finds it essential to begin empowering young women at an early age in the same way that Saint Mary’s empowers women throughout their collegiate years.“When all of [the current students] find Saint Mary’s to be such a great place for expanding our minds and planning to make a difference, it only makes sense that we host a day like this to show young girls that anything is possible, no matter what field of study,” Kiefer said.Tags: hypatia, Hypatia Day, Kristin Kuter, Saint Mary’s hypatia day, STEMlast_img read more


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first_img Press Association In a surprise development, United sources claimed on Wednesday that the club made a bid to sign Mane last week. Southampton deny any offer has been submitted for the Senegalese winger, but a spokesman for the south-coast club said Mane is “not for sale” anyway. Southampton insist Manchester United target Sadio Mane is not for sale.center_img Despite making five signings this summer, United manager Louis van Gaal believes his squad lack pace and creativity, and Mane certainly has both those qualities in abundance. Southampton signed the 23-year-old from Red Bull Salzburg last summer for £10million. In his first year at Saints he scored 10 goals in 32 appearances, including the fastest hat-trick in Premier League history in the 6-1 win over Aston Villa. The move for the player still comes as something of a surprise, however. United were reported to be close to the capture of Barcelona forward Pedro last week, but it emerged on Wednesday the club had pulled out of the running to sign the 28-year-old. Sources at Old Trafford claim Van Gaal decided to abandon a bid to sign the Canary Islander after doubts emerged regarding whether he wanted to move to the 20-time English champions. Pedro now looks set to move to Chelsea instead. last_img read more


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first_imgSyracuse head coach Quentin Hillsman waved his arms above his head and begged for his defense to get a stop. Notre Dame ran fast, but in the first quarter of Syracuse’s Feb. 25 matchup, SU kept up. It forced turnovers, rebounded on misses under the basket and pushed the other way.But the Fighting Irish kept firing, they kept running. They scored one bucket, then another, then another. As the 3-pointers started to fall, the inside opened up. Syracuse’s bigs were no match for the Irish. The Orange had long run a press to force turnovers and push transition, but in the second quarter they fell back, and defensive holes were exploited. As the game grew out of reach, Hillsman’s hands fell to his side. Missed assignments, poor switches and late reactions were too much. He put his hands to his knees.“You have a chance on your home floor playing against one of the best teams in the country, and we know that they’re a very good basketball team, I really feel that we’re a very good basketball team,” Hillsman said postgame. “But to come on the floor and perform this way is very disappointing.”No. 12 Syracuse (24-8, 11-5 Atlantic Coast) has struggled with its interior defense the entire season. Against strong forward units, the Orange have shown an inability to stay in front of offensive players in the post and from the elbow, frequently falling to a quick first step to the basket. SU’s best blocker, Emily Engstler, ranks just 130th in the nation with 1.30 per game. Hillsman frequently references the unit’s youth as a main factor of the struggles, but inside defense is a holistic effort. Penetration and passes inside the arc past guards have allowed opponents to take advantage of the Orange, he said.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAnna Henderson | Digital Design EditorThe Orange, who earned a No. 3 seed in the NCAA Tournament, drew a first round matchup with No. 14 Fordham on Saturday in the Carrier Dome. The Rams rely mainly on their backcourt with three guards in their top-four scorers, but forward Mary Goulding has provided a consistent presence down low with 12.9 points per game. Though Fordham might not provide a prevalent interior challenge, the Orange’s paint defense has dictated their ability to take control of games and will be an important piece for Syracuse in the NCAA Tournament.At the end of each practice, Syracuse runs a defensive slides drill. Associate head coach Vonn Read starts while defenders position themselves in the Orange’s 2-3 zone. Read passes the ball to the lead guard who swings it to a wing player. After the pass, defenders rotate into new spots. The strong side player at the top of the zone rotates to the ball, and the weak side player minds the elbow. The strong side player at the bottom of the zone denies on the wing, and the center of the zone fills the spot they left while the weak side player minds the basket.The rotation allows defenders to practice their assignment-based shifts dependent on ball-movement. The flow is sometimes broken by quick passing, though, like when the Orange were broken down against Notre Dame’s dangerous perimeter attack. Other problems have sometimes persisted in standstill sets.In two matchups with Miami this season, Emese Hof and Beatrice Mompremier combined for 85 points and 32 rebounds on the interior. Both players operate mainly on straight-line drives from the elbow. In the ACC Tournament, Mompremier scored multiple baskets in a row by drawing an SU defender to the free throw line and using one dribble to blow past them to a wide-open rim. Unlike the drill the Orange frequently practice, the weak side defender is often late.Versatile forwards have given Syracuse trouble multiple times this season and have allowed an average 35.25 points in the paint in its losses. Against Miami, Hof and Mompremier easily found openings. And in their biggest loss, the Irish used the Orange’s struggles on the interior to their advantage, UND head coach Muffet McGraw said. They began the game with a “high-low” attack in an attempt to “suck in” the Syracuse zone, freeing space for their perimeter attack. That’s exactly what the Orange did, and their shortcomings lessened their presence around the 3-point line.“I think it was just a credit to our post,” Notre Dame guard Arike Ogunbowale said. “They have a good inside-out game, they’re able to find the guards on the perimeter.”Its zone collapsed, its transition defense struggled, its shots didn’t fall. Though shooting slumps have hurt the Orange this season, Read said SU doesn’t need to shoot a high percentage to win games. But, as a part of its margin-based system, when opponents find the openings it has inside, Syracuse is left without a chance to battle back. Comments Published on March 19, 2019 at 10:52 pm Contact Michael: mmcclear@syr.edu | @MikeJMcClearycenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more