Chad Central African Republic UN envoy welcomes release of child soldiers

“I have been given assurances that parties involved in conflict have agreed to free children in both countries,” the UN’s Special Representative for Children and Armed Conflict Radhika Coomaraswamy said in a statement today. “The next challenge will be to reintegrate the children with their families and communities,” she added.In Chad the Government has agreed to let UN agencies visit army camps and training centres to verify the releases and identify children, Ms. Coomaraswamy told reporters today in New York, after completing her visit. A Government task force on reintegration of children will also be created. Ms. Coomaraswamy noted, however, that in Chad there have still not been any commitments on child recruitment by non-government armed groups who, she said, “recruit a great many children.”In Chad the UN envoy met with rebel leader Laurent Djim Wei of the Armée Populaire pour la Restauration de la Démocratie (APRD) who agreed to provide a list of all children associated with his group and to release them once the UN presents an action plan for their reintegration.“We’re very happy about this. We don’t know the exact numbers but this should happen in the near future,” Ms. Coomaraswamy said, but added that currently there are not enough resources for the effective reintegration of children into their communities. She said her office and the UN country team in Chad would now try to raise funds for the process.The UN envoy also met with Zacharia Damane, of the Union des Forces Démocratiques pour l’Unité (UFDR), an armed group in the north-east of the country, to monitor compliance with an accord signed a year ago with the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the Government on the release of children. In the northwest of the Central African Republic (CAR) Ms. Coomaraswamy held meetings with internally displaced families.“They do not live in camps. They actually go back to the bush and the living conditions are intolerable,” she said. “They showed us the water they drink which is full of mud… We spoke with the women separately and they told us stories of sexual violence in the bush and they also told us how children were recruited and then re-recruited, if they ran away, by the non-state actors in the region.” She added that UNICEF has begun to set up makeshift schools in the bush so that children can go to classes, but stressed that there were no health centres or health facilities anywhere in the area.However, Ms. Coomaraswamy told reporters that there were some grounds for optimism in the country after efforts by the UN and the international diplomatic community to broker a peace accord. “There is a hope that by the end of this month there will be a major agreement among all the armed actors in CAR and we have been pushing all sides to include a provision for the protection of children in the peace agreement,” she said. 2 June 2008Chad has agreed to release all former child combatants held in detention, while armed rebel groups in the Central African Republic (CAR) have also committed to freeing any children in their ranks, a top United Nations envoy announced today after a six day trip to the two countries. read more

Markets update at midmorning

On the markets at midmorning (ET):The Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index was up 36.22 points to 15,425.82, after 90 minutes of trading.In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average was down 13.23 points to 22,399.36. The S&P 500 index was down 4.62 points to 2,503.62 and the Nasdaq composite index was down 32.34 points to 6,423.70.The Canadian dollar was trading at 81.07 cents US, down from Wednesday’s average price of 81.48 cents US.The November crude contract was down three cents to US$50.66 per barrel and the October natural gas contract was down 11 cents to US$2.98 per mmBTU.The December gold contract was down $24.10 to US$1,292.30 an ounce and the December copper contract was down three cents to US$2.94 a pound. read more

TSX up as Fed minutes indicate no rush to hike rates dissension

TSX up as Fed minutes indicate no rush to hike rates, dissension on job growth by Malcolm Morrison, The Canadian Press Posted Aug 20, 2014 7:39 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email TORONTO – The Toronto stock market closed higher Wednesday as traders got some reassurance about interest rates from the minutes of the latest meeting of the U.S. Federal Reserve.The S&P/TSX composite index rose 84.78 points to 15,561.95. The Canadian dollar was down 0.23 a cent at 91.15 cents US as the greenback strengthened after the release of the minutes.Most U.S. markets finished higher as the minutes indicated that the U.S. central bank is in no rush to hike rates. However, they also showed greater dissension among Fed members on how fast the labour market is improving, a key element in determining when it will raise rates from near zero, where they’ve been since the financial crisis.The Dow Jones industrials gained 59.54 points to 16,979.13, the Nasdaq declined 1.03 points to 4,526.48 and the S&P 500 index climbed 4.91 points at 1,986.51.The Fed has emphasized that economic data, not the calendar, will determine when it hikes rates, generally expected around the middle of 2015.Slack in the labour market has been a particular concern, a topic that Fed chairwoman Janet Yellen is expected to address in her speech to the central bank’s economic symposium at the end of the week.“We’re looking to confirm the Fed’s accommodative stance and give us a bit of insight on how they think about the slack in the labour market,” said Patrick Blais, managing director and portfolio manager at Manulife Asset Management.While U.S. job growth has been coming in at around 200,000 monthly, the participation rate has drifted down to a percentage in the lows 60s.“And, in the back of their mind, they want to play safe and make sure the U.S. is on a real sustainable footing before giving any indication that they’re going to retreat from their easy monetary policy stance,” Blais said.Traders also digested a mixed bag of data from the retail sector.Sears Canada Inc. (TSX:SCC) reported a quarterly net loss of $21.3 million, or 21 cents per share, compared with a profit of $152.8 million, or $1.50, a year ago. Same-store sales dropped 6.8 per cent, which the company attributed partly to an unseasonably cool spring. Its shares shed 12 cents to $15.95.U.S. retailer Target, which is in the midst of a costly expansion into Canada, posted adjusted earnings of 78 cents a share, a penny less than expected. Revenue came in at US$17.41 billion, higher than the US$17.38 billion that analysts expected. Its shares erased early losses to advance $1.09 to US$60.34 as Target also cut its 2014 earnings forecast to between US$3.10 and US$3.30 a share, versus the previous forecast of US$3.49.Quarterly net income at home improvement retailer Lowe’s increased 10 per cent to US$1.04 billion, or $1.04 per share, bolstered by improving weather. The performance beat analysts’ expectations, but the company lowered its full-year revenue outlook slightly. Its shares were up 80 cents at US$52.32.The metals and mining sector led advancers, up two per cent as September copper shot up nine cents to US$3.18 a pound. Some analysts attributed the jump to signs of a rebound in the U.S. housing sector, including strong data on housing starts and solid improvement in a prominent builders’ confidence survey.The energy gained 0.7 per cent with the September crude contract — which expires Wednesday — surging $1.59 to US$96.07 a barrel. The October contract climbed 59 cents to US$93.45. Prices shot up as data showed a drop in U.S. supplies of about 4.5 million barrels last week, about three times the amount that had been expected.The gold sector edged up about 0.15 per cent as December bullion dipped $1.50 to US$1,295.20 an ounce. read more

Council accused of corporate vandalism after sandstone cliffs painted wrong shade of

A council has been accused of “corporate vandalism” by a geologist after historic sandstone cliffs were painted the “wrong” shade of red. East Devon District Council carried out work to stabilise the ancient stone cliffs in Sidmouth by installing bolts set in concrete into the rockface.Contractors painted the concrete sections red – to “help it blend in with the surrounding stone”.However, the work was criticised by local residents and experts, including geologist Dr Alasdair Bruce, who described the council’s effort as “corporate vandalism”.He said: “They have sprayed most of the cliff. It’s almost like an Eric Sykes film.”I’ve seen councils do some strange things with cliffs but this clanger really is at the top of the pile.”The cliffs date back 220 million years to the Triassic period.Bill Shaw, a metal sculptor from Bideford on holiday with his wife, Peach, said: “It’s a bit weird. It just looks fake.”It’s the wrong red as well. It should be more of a terracotta colour or would be better just left as it was.”Geoff Jung, from East Devon District Council, said: “The concrete was dyed to help it blend in with the surrounding stone as opposed to leaving it as a plain concrete finish.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

14 signs that youre probably an awkward person

first_imgIS THERE ANYONE who doesn’t think that they’re awkward?Probably not, mainly because all of these situations are painfully awkward no matter how suave you are.1. Constant, repeated, distant eye contactIt never doesn’t happen. That quick eye contact with someone across the room or on a bus, the realisation that you’ve been staring, before quickly looking away. Then you have to check that they’re not looking at you weirdly and, surprise surprise, they’re looking back and you to begin a circle of vicious awkwardness. Source: Imgur2. Being the only one to laugh at your own jokeIt’s not your fault that some people can’t see how gas you are. This doesn’t make it any less awkward when you tell what you think is a killer joke and all that you’re left with is your howling laughter among a deafening silence.It’s not nearly as painful as the follow-up reasoning of “you had to be there”, though.3. Not ‘getting it’The complete opposite of being the lone laugher. Everyone is in hysterics about something you just didn’t find that funny so you fake laugh a bit until the laughter dies down.Will they think I’ve no sense of humour?DO I have no sense of humour?4. Showing your friends YouTube videosThere is nothing icier than the awkward silence and pity laughs that come when you show your friends a YouTube video you thought was absolutely gas but they just sit there unimpressed.“It gets better,” you plead.It doesn’t get better, and you damn well know it. Source: Shutterstock5. Talking when people don’t hear youYou’re halfway through a story and the person you’re talking to keeps shouting ‘what?’ or has just stopped acknowledging your existence altogether.When do you stop? How do you stop? Should you just fade your story out and crawl off to the dark corner you belong in?6. Saying hi to someone, then meeting them againIn any situation, this is awkward. You’ve met each other in the supermarket aisle and had a little chat, said all you’ve wanted to say, pretended to feign an interest in this distant aquaintances life. Painless. But now you’ve bumped into them in the cereal aisle and the questions come flooding in.Do we stop again?Do I say hi and just walk off? But we’ve already met each other.There are no right answers, just discomfort.7. See someone you know approaching from the distanceThe etiquette here is to ignore their existence until they’re closer, but it doesn’t make the situation any pleasanter.However, what’s worse is the alternative– waving to them from far away, then just staring until they reach you.8. Having Happy Birthday sung to youWHAT ARE YOU ACTUALLY SUPPOSED TO DO?9. The delay on a conference call“Hel–” “Hel–” “No, you go–” “You go.” [Silence] “Well–” “OK so–” “No sorry, you go.”The three second delay of a long distance call then often results in saying stupid sentences to continue talking in a feigned effort to ease the awkwardness.10. Someone talking to you while you’re chewingThey ask you a question just as you show a fork of pasta in your mouth or take a huge gulp of a drink.Just give me ONE MINUTE. Grand, but they sit there staring at you expectantly while you finish chewing as you desperately point to your mouth or make weird, panicked eye movements in an attempt to explain your silence.11. When you keep mishearing someoneSorry? What? Sorry? I’m sorry, I can’t really hear you.12. When the friend you’re with runs into a friendWhat is there to do? What is there to say? What’s worse is if your so-called-friend fails to introduce you and you’re left standing there like the gormless clinger-on you are. Source: Shutterstock13. Avoiding people walking towards youAh, the classic. You’re approaching a stranger on the street and they decide to go the same way as you as you try to avoid them. There’s the stifled laughing, the relay of sorry, sorry, oh sorry. Source: Tumblr14. Having nothing to talk aboutSilence isn’t always golden. Source: Welovedatesh/t RedditEnda Kenny is the absolute definition of awkward>Video montage of students who think a photo is being taken is hilariously awkward>last_img read more

Universum War Front is a game you wont believe was created by

first_imgTake a quick look at the gallery of images above, and then take the time to watch the Kickstarter video below. I think you’ll agree that as a game, Universum: War Front looks stunning. But what’s incredible about this project is the fact it has been made by just one guy acting as programmer, artist, animator, and game designer.His name is Cyril Megem, and he used to be lead artist working at French publishing company Monte Christo. Last year he decided to quit and create his own game as an indie developer, with the result being Universum: War Front just over a year later. His only help has been from Brian Dinh, who recently joined the team to handle promotion and community work.Now Universum is on Kickstarter, but Cyril is only asking for $20,000 to finish it. That’s a lot less than many other games ask for on Kickstarter, and they don’t look half as good as this and have a comparably large team behind them. That fact alone will get the project lots of pledges, especially when you can secure a copy of the game for just $10.Cyril says Universum has been inspired by Warhammer, Battlefield, DOTA, and Star Wars. He describes the game as an “FPS, RTS, MOBA RPG in one Space Epic.” When playing you can switch from controlling a group of soldiers to taking control of just one. Characters are customizable, you can drive a range of vehicles, mechs, and even alien creatures. And did we mention how stunning it looks?At the time of writing the game has already reached $19,000 with 24 days still left to go, so there’s no doubt Universum: War Front is going to get funded. There’s also stretch goals taking it up as far as $500,000. I doubt it will get that high, but the $50,000 and $75,000 goals are certainly in reach if it gets some momentum behind it. VIEW PHOTO GALLERY Universum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War Frontlast_img read more

Child remains in care after parents refuse to answer phone or turn

first_img By Sean Murray AT THE END of September last year, there were 6,329 children in care in Ireland. In each case before the court, a judge had to issue a care order, ruling that the State was taking the appropriate course of action.  Later, the same judges are asked to rule on whether the children should return home to their parents, or remain in care.Previously, all such court hearings were in camera (private) and the media could not attend. That rule was changed so a light could be shone on proceedings, and society could be made aware of the issues that the court deals with in relation to family breakdowns, children in care, and domestic violence.Having done so on a number of occasions last year, TheJournal.ie spent another two days in the family courts recently to report on the nature of the cases that come before it. In the third of this four part series, parents have failed to turn up to a hearing that will decide if their children will remain in care.WITH THE PARENTS absent from proceedings, a judge ruled last week that an infant would remain in foster care.Over the course of the short hearing, counsel for the parents, Tusla and the guardian ad litem – representing the interests of the child – all acquiesced to the order being extended.Missed access appointments, unsuitable living arrangements and the uncontactable parents were all cited as contributing to the decision that the child should remain in care for the time being.“Long standing concerns”The Tusla social worker told the court that both parents had missed at least half of the access appointments to see their child in recent months.On one of the occasions where both attended, there appeared to be an issue between the mother and father co-parenting, the court heard, with the father shouting at the access worker and leaving after only 15 minutes.Access was offered regularly to the parents at first, the court heard, but this was scaled down from three times a week to two due to the parents non-appearance at these appointments.There was one appointment, however, that the parents turned up a half hour early for and, due to an error by staff at the front desk, the social worker wasn’t told they had arrived.They grew frustrated and left before the social worker knew they were there.There were also a range of concerns around the parents’ living conditions, which the court heard would be completely unsuitable for a young child.The social worker offered to arrange alternative accommodation for the parents on several occasions, but this was repeatedly turned down.The court-appointed guardian agreed that the parents were extremely hard to reach, saying that they never answered phone calls and would only ever respond to a message through texting.Although there were concerns of domestic violence and alcohol abuse among the parents, it was difficult to substantiate because it was so hard to reach them, the guardian said.The guardian added that the child was now thriving in an “excellent foster home”.The judge extended the interim care order for the child, and said that the case would be heard again next month.Comments have been closed for legal reasons.Read: A day in the Family Court: Child not told when father might visit to ‘avoid disappointment’Read: Child in foster care has “serious anxiety” and worries about his mother’s welfare Short URL Share Tweet Email1 Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Thursday 20 Apr 2017, 6:15 AM No Comments Apr 20th 2017, 6:15 AM Child remains in care after parents refuse to answer phone or turn up to court hearing The family court heard that the family had living arrangements “unsuitable for a young child”. https://jrnl.ie/3336284 Image: Shutterstock/Tammada 22,238 Views Image: Shutterstock/Tammadalast_img read more

Class of 92 hero not bitter about career

first_imgThe class of 92 are regarded as the greatest academy products in the history of Manchester United and rightfully so.A class which produced players like Ryan Giggs, Paul Scholes, Gary and Phil Neville, and David Beckham helped steer the course of Manchester United’s future.However, for every Scholes, there’s always a Ben Thornley. Regarded as one of the most talented players in the academy back in the early 90s, Thornley suffered a serious injury that ended his dream before it even started.“Ben would have outdone all of us,” said Beckham, according to ESPN.“England wouldn’t have had a left-wing problem for so many years,” said Nicky Butt. “He was one of — if not the — most talented members of that team,” said Neville.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“The feelings, if I ever did have those, had long since evaporated,” Thornley tells ESPN. “That was in 1999; the injury happened to me in ’94. I quickly knew I was never going to be a first-team regular at United, even though I stayed there for another three-and-a-half year.”“I just got caught up in the game itself and the celebrations afterward. It was a brilliant night, and it never crossed my mind once that this could’ve been me. I was just so thrilled for the boys I’d grown up with to be involved with such an incredible season.”“I had two feet and was able to shift the ball by squaring up the full-back,” Thornley says, “either towards the touchline or coming back inside to whip a ball in with my right foot. That little half-yard was something that (a) they had to guess which way I was going, and (b) by the time they had, I had already gone.”“That was something that it quickly became apparent I didn’t have anymore. It was like having a piece of string or piece of wood: once you break it down the middle and try to repair it, it’s never as strong as it once was. When you’re talking about playing at the top level, you are talking about fine margins. That was the type of thing I relied on.”“I can’t put everything down to that one tackle,” he says, when asked about the psychological impact of his injury, “but I’m sure there are people far more qualified than me who can trace what I’m like now as a person right the way back to it. It’s like you’ve had a fabulous party and you come home: there’s an emptiness there. That’s what I felt not going into a dressing room every day.”last_img read more

Surveillance camera captures North Miami cellphone store breakin

first_imgNORTH MIAMI, FLA. (WSVN) – Police are on the lookout for a trio of attempted burglars after they targeted a North Miami cellphone store.Video of the Nov. 10 burglary shows three subjects smashing the glass door of the TracFone Wireless store, located near Northwest Seventh Avenue and 120th Street.An alarm went off, scaring the group away before they could get inside.Police are now searching for the trio.If you have any information on this break-in, call Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at 305-471-TIPS. Remember, you can always remain anonymous, and you may be eligible for a $1,000 reward.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

Man killed in Chattogram fire

first_imgFlame billows in the Sree Sree Loknath Temple. Photo: UNBA temple employee died of suffocation after a fire broke out at Askar Dighir Par in Chattogram city on Thursday night, reports UNB.The deceased Arun Chakrawarty, 60, was the accountant of Sree Sree Loknath Temple located in the area.The fire broke out at a tin-shed house in the area around 8:00pm and it soon engulfed the adjacent temple, nine houses and some shops, said Kamal Uddin, assistant director at fire service and civil defence, Chattogram.On information, three fire fighting units went to the spot and extinguished the blaze, he added.The firefighters rescued Arun, who suffered suffocation during the fire, at the temple and took him to Chittagong Medical College Hospital where doctors declared him dead around 10:00pm.A three-member committee was formed to investigate the matter.last_img read more

Amazon Focused on Building the Game Industrys Digital Infrastructure

first_imgEpic Games uses AWS to scale to meet the demands that come from hosting 125 million players across several platforms. The flexibility of the cloud allows studios like Epic Games to scale up and down quickly, taking advantage of AWS’s like computing power, database storage, and content delivery.Amazon has a big presence in the gaming industry. They own Twitch, the largest live streaming platform, they’ve developed Lumberyard, their own game engine, they have several projects currently in development through Amazon Games studios like New World, and they are rumors that the company is developing their own Netflix-like streaming platform for games (although Taptich wouldn’t talk about that during our meeting). During GDC, however, the focus was on how Amazon works with developers across the industry. As more multiplayer-focused titles like “Fallout 76” and “Anthem” launch in a games-as-service style model the backend services that Amazon, and their competitors, provide will become increasingly important. A flawless launch for multiplayer titles is expected, even though recent titles haven’t met that expectation. “That’s our job. We need to innovate in ways to make sure launches like that don’t happen,” Taptich added. “You don’t do the type events that Fortnite does, like the Marshmello concert where millions of people log on at once, happening without the flexibility that comes with cloud infrastructure.”Taptich emphasized that while all developers want to create great games, the issues with launches and backend infrastructure only take time away from core development and hinder the quality of the final product. That’s why they should be handled by a dependable external service, developers should be focusing on the games themselves. “The public cloud wasn’t invented to run games,” he said. “But game developers have embraced it for a ton of reasons, they need to scale their games up and down, they don’t want to spend all that time building out their backend infrastructure.” While most of the discussion around Amazon’s presence in the game industry revolves around their scattershot game projects and rumored cloud gaming platform, the tech giant has been far more involved in building the backend infrastructure for major games.Companies like Square Enix and Zynga both use Amazon Games Tech, Amazon’s portfolio of services that help studios launch dedicated servers, access Amazon-specific developer tools, and use a variety of other features to help developers launch and maintain their games. Last year, Epic Games announced that they were “all in” on AWS, Amazon Web Service, for their gigantic free-to-play shooter, “Fortnite.”“People take for granted that ‘Fortnite’ works on a massive and global scale, it’s extraordinary,” Brian Taptich, who started as vice president of Amazon Games Tech eighteen months ago, tells Variety at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco. “It’s not like people are booting ‘Fortnite’ up and saying ‘I hope this works, I hope this goes live. That’s not an issue.’” ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 Expectations in the industry are wildly changing as games like “Fortnite” and “Apex Legends” attract millions of players. The work to create the infrastructure needed to keep these games running has already become a tremendous challenge on its own.“Amazon is known for being customer-obsessed, and Bezos said that customers are divinely discontent. Today’s wow turns into tomorrow’s ordinary,” Taptich said. “That quote is perfectly applicable to the games industry, things that worked last year or two years ago are just taken for granted. We’re always focused on the next big innovation.” Popular on Variety last_img read more

NYCC Stan Against Evil Balances Out Horror with Heart

first_img IFC’s horror comedy Stan Against Evil may not have been on a ton of peoples’ radars when its first season premiered last year, but it definitely should have been. It was hard to tell what to make of it at first, but creator Dana Gould said the show is pretty much exactly what it seems to be. It’s a traditional half-hour sitcom stuck in the middle of a horror movie. With its second season premiering November 1, stars John C. McGinley, Janet Varney and creator Dana Gould sat down with press at New York Comic Con to talk about the upcoming season.Gould was refreshingly upfront about what was coming in season two. With so many TV shows keeping everything secret, it was nice to meet a creator who would gladly lay out the entire plot of season two if we asked. It helps that it’s a comedy and the stakes surrounding the show isn’t anywhere near as high as with Marvel’s stuff. In fact, he started off with a minor spoiler: Sheriff Evie lives. We all suspected that she would somehow make it out of last season’s cliffhanger. Plus, she’s here talking to the press, so she’s obviously still on the show. A funny story Gould related to us and later at the panel, he had no idea where the show would go if it got a second season. If you watched season one, you know it ended with Evie about to be burned at the stake. While they were shooting that scene, Gould said he whispered into Varney’s ear, “I have no idea how to get you out of this.” Always a great note to end a season on.Thankfully, he figured out a way and the show will continue on for another eight episodes. The second season will expand the series’ mythology a lot more, Gould says. The first two episodes will be about Stan getting Evie back. Because she’s been burned at the stake in the 1600s, she’s never existed. Stan is the only person who remembers that someone named Evie should be there. The first two episodes will be spent on him trying to get her back. Gould says the rest of the series will follow Stan, now knowing that time travel exists, as he tries to prevent his wife’s death. That arc will be the focus of the final two episodes. The remaining four will be the bloody, hilarious monster-of-the-week stuff we got in season one.John C. McGinley, Dana Gould, Janet VarneyGould has always been interested in horror movies. “Ever since I was a kid, I watched horror movies and I wanted to be in a horror movie,” he said. “I didn’t want to be the star, I wanted to be the goofy weird guy. I wanted to be Dwight Fry in Dracula or Peter Cushing in Horror of Dracula.” His desire to be in the horror movie business led him to pursue comedy and eventually get himself into a position where he could write a show and cast himself in the part. “It only took me 30 years in the business, but that is what I ended up doing.”He’s not shy about how long it took him to get here. “I’ve had my hand in more failed pilots than an Air Force proctologist,” he said. One of them had a similar tone to Stan. He described it as a combination of Seinfeld and Peewee’s Playhouse. “It was a sitcom trapped in a hyper-realistic world… I took a traditional show and I put it in a world where it didn’t belong. Stan Against Evil is a sitcom that somebody dropped in the middle of a horror movie. And they don’t know they’re in a horror movie. And the horror movie doesn’t know they’re in a sitcom. It’s just that simple.”Gould said his biggest inspiration for the show was An American Werewolf in London. Saying he’s worked with John Landis before, Gould says “What he realized is, if you told a traditional horror movie, but just had people behave normally, and not in a stylized way, then you don’t need to write them funny because people are funny. People are funny normally, in real life. The other person that does this is Quentin Tarantino. People are funny, and they talk about weird stuff. They could be in the middle of a gun battle and talking about pancakes. That happens in real life.”If you watched the first season, you noticed that it found its monster-of-the-week formula very quickly. Once that happened, the actors kept things interesting. To hear Gould tell it, that was all them. “What John and Janet brought to there characters is so much more than what’s on the page,” he said. It forces me to be a better writer, because I have to write up to their performance. John just invested Stan with so much humanity that just was not there in my script.”John C. McGinleyMcGinley told me he took a lot from Archie Bunker to create Stan. McGinley talked at length about appearing on Norman Lear’s podcast two weeks ago. He said meeting Lear was a “bucket list” item for him, as he’d borrowed from Carol O’Connor’s archetype “unabashedly” with Stan. Despite that, he actually goes a little less Archie with Stan this year. “Dana wrote Stan a little more heroic this year. What I mean is, in the finale of season one, Evie is sent back 600 years and he’s going to be burnt at the stake. While Stan is an Archie Bunker equal opportunity offender, his actions don’t always support his defaming people. He does the heroic thing, he does go back and get her.”Most of why we like Stan, despite his misanthropy, is because of Claire, McGinley said. He described his approach to building the character in season one. “Stan’s missing piece is Claire. That has to be acknowledged, and that has to be excavated. Stan can’t just be a jackass, we’ll change the channel. There has to be something redemptive about him, and it’s Claire. I told that to Normal Lear, and he told me this incredible story about Archie and Edith. The only reason we care about Archie is because of Edith, because she’s so stunning. And he told me this story about how Edith starts to circle the drain when… there was a transsexual character that Norman wrote who gets killed. And Edith starts to question her faith,” McGinley said.As he told this story, he became visibly emotional. He says he nearly started crying. He may play tough guys on TV, but he’s a kindhearted dude in real life. “Norman interviewed all these psychologists and shrinks at UCLA about how people get their faith back when it’s been taken from them,” he continued. “Because Edith without faith started to go away. And they found that it was Archie. Without Edith, Archie would be gone… I have Norman Lear telling me this story, and I’m like, same with Stan. Stan is Claire. And that’s what floats everything for me. It feels liberating.”Janet VarneyBoth Gould and McGinley talked at length about Varney, repeating multiple times that she carries the show. McGinley compared the show to screwball comedies of the 1940s. Those are comedies where the female lead drives the action. It takes a very skilled and agile actor to make this style of comedy work, he said, and that’s exactly who Janet is.Varney says she’s thrilled to have such a complex, well-written hero to play. “It’s not just like, ‘hey let’s put this token woman in a tight suit and she’ll kick some ass and that’s a strong woman.” No, these women are complicated. It’s sort of the Jean Grey… this is a complex person who doesn’t know what to do with what she feels and what she can do. I think there’s something really appealing about that to people watching. That’s how we would feel.”Varney says she’s especially excited to get more screen time with Stan’s daughter, Denise. Throughout the interviews and panel, all three of the present cast had nothing but fantastic praise for Deborah Baker Jr. In an episode screened during the panel (the third one of the season), Denise has her own little subplot by herself. That is one of Baker’s great strengths, according to both Varney and McGinley. You can put her on screen by herself, and she’ll create a whole compelling world. (In the episode, “Curse of the Were-Pony,” she creates a whole tiny town so the new pony won’t feel self-conscious.) Varney also says she has some great scenes with Stan. This season, she says, goes to places that are much more intense than season one. “I walked away from this season feeling really emotionally drained, but in a great way, like I did actually feel like an actor. I’m an actor after all!” Varney joked. “Not a comedian! We walked away and I was like, this is the most emotionally grounded work I’ve had the honor of doing on a show, and yet it’s the most wackadoo show I’ve ever been on.”Honestly, I can’t think of a better way to describe Stan Against Evil than that. We can all see exactly what she means when the show returns to IFC on November 1.Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. Hands-On: Monster Energy Supercross is More Exciting Than Soft DrinksCosplay Gallery: New York Comic Con 2017, Part 2 Stay on targetlast_img read more

WBSCL join hands with Howrah City Police to impart training to unemployed

first_imgKolkata: West Bengal Swarojgar Corporation Limited (WBSCL) has joined hands with Howrah City Police to impart training to unemployed youth under the latter’s jurisdictional area so that they become self-reliant. The training under Project Kiran initiated by Howrah City Police will be offered to 250 such youth under seven police station areas.”We are starting with the training of 250 youth but our target is to train 1,000 such youth in various vocations so that they become self-sufficient,” said Pulak Roy, chairman of WBSCL. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedA senior official of WBSCL, which comes under the aegis of the Self-Help Group (SHG) department of the state government, informed that two places have already been earmarked for imparting the training. The areas in which the youth will be trained are tailoring, beautician, driving and medical representative. Professionals and experts in the mentioned fields have been roped in by WBSCL so that the training is of international standards. “We have held talks with a leading garment organisation who will be offering a one month training to those who successfully complete our tailor training. Following this, they have agreed to absorb these youth. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJPDriving licences will be given free of cost to those who successfully complete our driving training,” a senior WBSCL official said.The SHG department will hold job fairs to facilitate the trained youth seek employment. Apart from local unemployed youth, the Howrah City Police have identified unemployed persons from the police family and from those who had once been criminals but are now seeking a path of reform to reap the benefits of the training. Kolkata Police had launched its Kiran programme a few years back and already more than 800 people have received training.last_img read more

Deloitte KPMG PWC empanelled for RBIs info systems audit

first_imgDeloitte, KPMG, PWC and four others have been empanelled by the Reserve Bank for conducting audit of information systems of the central bank. The other agencies are, AAA Technologies, Auditime, Digital Age Strategies and Mahindra SSG. “With reference to our Expression of Interest (EOI) sought for ‘Empanellment of Firms for Conducting Information Systems/ Information Technology (IS/IT) Audit’ within the Bank, we advise the…(seven) firms have been included in the panel for conducting Information Systems/Information Technology Audit…,” the Reserve Bank said. The panel will remain valid for a period of three years, in normal course, subject to the condition that the firms/ individuals continue to be on the panel of approved auditors released by the CERT-In (Indian Computer Emergency Response Team), it said.The broad scope of work include security assessments/ reviews of — application, network, operating systems, databases, source code and System Development Life Cycle, among others.last_img read more

Several Puja committees come under IT scanner over TDS details

first_imgKolkata: A number of Puja committees in the city have come under the scanner of the Income Tax department regarding the furnishing of Tax Deducted at Source (TDS) details.Sources in the I-T department said that they had sent notices to around 40 Puja committees, directing them to turn up with details of their TDS in connection with organising Durga Puja. They have been asked to be present on Monday and Tuesday. A number of clubs in the city spend a lot on theme Pujas every year, for publicity, decoration of pandals and idols, lighting, etc. “We are ignorant about dealing with the TDS issue. We are also not too sure on whether we have to submit TDS for this year or for the next year,” said a Puja organiser in North Kolkata who refused to be named. As per figures available with the I-T department, the expenditure during Durga Puja 2018 has been to the tune of around Rs 5,000 crore by the different clubs.last_img read more

1000 OBC certificates distributed in S Kolkata

first_imgKolkata: Rajib Banerjee, state minister for Backward Classes Welfare Department, along with Chandrima Bhattacharya, minister of state for Health distributed 1000 OBC certificates at Harijan Basti in South Kolkata on Wednesday.”This is a great initiative by our Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee, who has thought about the Backward Class people and their future security. These certificates will help the OBC children to get admission in schools and elderly people to get the benefits offered by the state government,” said Chandrima Bhattacharya. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseSK Thade, principal secretary, Backward Classes Welfare Department, said the response of the people was very encouring and more such camps will be held in south Kolkata. A special camp was organised on Tuesday, by district development office of Kolkata, and Backward Classes Welfare Department for distributing certificates and application form to the Scheduled Caste and other Backward Classes of ward number 86, under Kolkata Municipal Corporation. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataAfter coming to power in 2011, Mamata Banerjee had urged the Backward Classes Welfare department to take special initiative to issue caste certificates among the beneficiaries. Earlier, people faced enormous problem to get caste certificates and as a result they could not avail various benefits given by the Centre and state government. Camps are being held throughout Bengal to distribute caste certificates. After receiving the applications, certificates are issued within 15 days after making necessary verification.last_img read more

Hacker Dad Rigs Air Hockey Robot from 3D Printer Parts

first_img Young Sara Julio now has a strange — yet formidable — opponent to help improve her air hockey game: a robot that her dad engineered from 3-D printer parts.Jose Julio recounted the months-long construction process on his blog — all which began with a simple question: “How could I hack the components of a 3-D printer to make something different?”The result, seen in action below, is a remarkable achievement in that it can detect the puck (by color) and smack it back to opponents at extreme speeds.Related: Hershey’s Foray Into 3-D Printing Could Allow You to Be Your Own Willy WonkaThough technically complex, Julio noted that the robot is composed of “cheap and easily available” parts, including a PlayStation 3 camera, PC fans and other odds and ends.While the robot is currently tricky enough to beat a child, an experienced adult — like Julio himself — can still triumph, he said. He has provided a detailed copy of the build manual so that other aspiring engineers can reconstruct or improve upon his creation.Related: Salary Negotiation Lessons From the NHL Lockout Enroll Now for Free This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Nowcenter_img 1 min read February 10, 2014last_img read more

VIDEO RSNA Technology Report 2015 Enterprise Imaging

first_img Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Sponsored Content | Videos | Enterprise Imaging | January 04, 2016 VIDEO: RSNA Technology Report 2015: Enterprise Imaging Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Women’s Health View all 62 items Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Find more SCCT news and videos AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floorcenter_img Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports View all 9 items Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology View all 220 items Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Conference Coverage View all 396 items Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 25:23Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -25:23 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Recent Videos View all 606 items Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

Royal Princess Grand Princess to offer Mexico sailings in 201920

first_imgRoyal Princess, Grand Princess to offer Mexico sailings in 2019/20 SANTA CLARITA — Princess Cruises’ 2019-2020 lineup will include the introduction of one of the company’s newest ships to Mexico, Royal Princess, for its first full season based in L.A.Royal Princess will offer 27 total departures including seven-day Mexico itineraries, plus passengers get more time in port with an overnight in Cabo San Lucas on every five-day Cabo San Lucas Getaway sailing.As the only cruise line to sail year-round out of San Francisco, Princess also offers Grand Princess roundtrip 10-day Mexico itineraries in 2019. Star Princess will make her return to the west coast in 2019 as well, featuring 10-day Baja Peninsula & Sea of Cortez with roundtrip departures out of Los Angeles with an overnight in Cabo San Lucas.“Sailing the waters of Mexico honours the heritage of Princess cruising, with our first voyage in 1965 to the Mexican Riviera,” says Princess Cruises President Jan Swartz. “Now we provide guests more opportunities to experience the best of the region through culinary partnerships and immersive shore excursions, all while enjoying longer stays in port.”More news:  ‘Turn around year’ for TPI brings double-digit growthThe cruise line’s enhanced shore excursion offerings along the west coast take passengers off the beaten path, on culinary adventures featuring the local flavours of the region. Culinary shore excursions are available in Cabo San Lucas, Mazatlan and Puerto Vallarta. << Previous PostNext Post >> Friday, June 1, 2018 Posted bycenter_img Travelweek Group Tags: Mexico, Princess Cruises Sharelast_img read more