Category: xsavqgkv

Category: xsavqgkv

first_imgRegion 2 floodingLarge acreages of farmland located in the Pomeroon River, Region Two (Pomeroon-Supenaam) are currently inundated with six to eight inches of floodwater caused by excessive rainfall and poor drainage.Many farmers who spoke with this publication related that their lands were currently submerged and the floodwaters were not receding.Farmers using sand bags to stop breachesFarmers living in both lower and upper Pomeroon are affected and are counting their losses. Currently, cash crops such as pepper, pumpkin, plantain, lettuce, and cucumber are underwater. As such, farmers are forced daily to fill sand bags in an effort to prevent minor breaches along the riverbank.According to Rose Benn from Marlborough, Lower Pomeroon, her land has been under water for some time now and she has lost a large quantity of cash crops such as cucumbers, watermelons, bora and pumpkins. When asked what may be the main contributing factor to the flooding, Benn said excessive rainfall coupled with poor drainage.“The high tide did not affect us much this year; however, the continuous rainfall did – water kept accumulating on the lands and those who have poor empolders are facing problems,” Benn related.The farmer further added that many residents in the Marlborough area were forced to stay indoors during the holidays on account of the flooding. She reported the lower flat of her home was inundated given the intermittent rainfall.Another large-scale farmer, Vilma Da Silva also reported farmers’ lands were under water. She said many of her colleagues remained under water and their livelihoods were affected.Cash crop farmers in the Friendship, Hacney, Martindale, and Grant Pomeroon areas are also affected. Most persons living in riverine areas survive on farming.Farmers related that the trenches, canals and River are swollen. They reported that because of poor drainage water continued to flow into their lands.This publication understands that pumping is presently ongoing at the Dawa Pump Station. Meanwhile, on the Essequibo coastland, water is receding at a slow pace.Rice lands are currently under stress given the high accumulation of water. Eight pumps are currently in operation along the coast.The pump at Charity remains inoperable. Almost every village in Region Two was flooded owing to the excessive rainfall and overtopping. Many persons, especially poultry farmers, have lost thousands of dollars in stock. (Indrawattie Natram)last_img read more


Category: xsavqgkv

first_img Liverpool fans show their support at Anfield 1 Liverpool chief executive Ian Ayre has defended the club’s owners Fenway Sports Group ahead of a proposed ticket price protest by suggesting fans should “be careful what they wish for”.Supporters’ groups are planning the first walk-out in Anfield’s 132-year history in the 77th minute of Saturday’s match against Sunderland after a £77 match ticket (up from £59) and a £1,000 season ticket were announced this week.The club have argued the new structure – which includes 45 per cent of match tickets decreasing in price, 64 per cent of season tickets reduced or staying the same in cost, better availability for local fans and around 1,500 £9 tickets for category C games – offers greater accessibility and affordability.Earlier this week fans’ group Spirit of Shankly criticised FSG, the club’s American owners, claiming they refused to respond directly to some of their concerns during the consultation period and SoS and Spion Kop 1906 are now urging supporters to leave their seats in the 77th minute to demonstrate discontent at the price hike.“People should be careful what they wish for,” said Ayre, who spoke to try to allay the fears of fans and presented a case for greater accessibility to an increased-capacity Anfield as a £100million redevelopment of the Main Stand nears completion.“For those of us who were around when we didn’t have these types of owners (referring to the previous dysfunctional regime of Tom Hicks and George Gillett) making these type of decisions the club was in a real mess.“We have great owners – that £100million came interest-free and they don’t take a penny out of this football club.“People should make their own decisions but I feel absolutely we have made the right decision and have everyone’s best interests at heart.”The protest plans are gathering momentum but it remains to be seen how many will actually take direct action on Saturday.Ayre urged those considering walking out to go back and look at the whole ticket package the club was offering.“I respect everyone’s right to do what they think is right but for every fan thinking about that I would say ‘Have a look at the facts’,” he added.“You might be walking out for something you are not quite understanding.“If people want to leave after 77 minutes that is disappointing but it shouldn’t be because they feel the prices are wrong as there is something for everyone in there.“If someone who sits in a certain position where there is a £77 ticket next season but can’t afford it we have another option for them.“No-one is being priced out of the stadium. There is a seat for everyone at the right price.“That is the thing to look at before you take that type of action and walk out.“It can only be damaging to Liverpool if we have got it wrong and someone can define right and wrong in different ways.”The complaint that fans’ groups were merely paid lip service during the consultation period and their views were not listened to was also addressed by Liverpool’s chief executive.“I’d say that is the thing that surprised us the most,” he said.“A lot of clubs don’t engage in the dialogue we have engaged in for nine months, or have a supporters’ committee.“We have listened, but of course we can’t give everyone everything they want.“I have a responsibility as chief executive to run the business and we have to do the right things for our fans and the club and the mix is a really tough one to get right.“Even with the most vociferous of our fans we have said ‘We’ll have to agree to disagree on some things’ but the core of my job is to deliver the most sustainable solution for the club on and off the pitch and I feel we are doing that.”last_img read more


Category: xsavqgkv

first_imgAs disposal costs for Fats, Oils & Greases (FOG) remain high across Ireland, Donegal company DS Environmental Services Ltd in conjunction with Intertrade Ireland and Queen’s University Belfast continue to improve their services while striving to drive down the long term costs associated with this troublesome waste.What is FOG? Fats, Oils & Greases are a by-product of the catering industry and when they find their way into our sewers they put unnecessary strain on the network and cause major blockages in the system.For these reasons it is the responsibility for each food service establishment to have grease traps installed and emptied on a regular basis. Recent enforcement of legislation has caused the disposal of this material to rise significantly.Proactive solution for Donegals’ Catering industryDS Environmental Services Ltd has been taking a proactive approach to these challenges. Chemical Engineer with the company, Joe Wilson, has been working closely with the Questor centre at Queen’s University Belfast in developing new processes to manage Fats, Oils & Greases more efficiently. He is confident they will be able to offer their customers a much improved service in the near future. As part of a maintenance contract, the new service would include regular emptying and cleaning of grease traps, as well as advice on how to reduce the volume of grease going through the system. These measures would likely reduce the overall cost to the customer in the long runCommitment to the North WestDS Environmental Services continue striving towards improving the services on offer to their customers and for full details of their services check out www.dsenvironmental.ie or phone 074 9139522 DONEGAL COMPANY LEADS PROJECT TO LOWER COSTS AND IMPROVE MANAGEMENT OF GREASE TRAPS was last modified: October 15th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DS EnvironmentalQueens Universitylast_img read more


Category: xsavqgkv

first_imgThe Annual General Meeting of the Donegal Women’s League was held last night.The following officer board was electedChairperson Dessie Kelly Secretary Brid McGintyTreasurers Tena Quigley & Brid McGintyRegistrar Paula IrwinPRO Brid McGinty Children’s Officer Sara HerronReferees Appointment Officer Con McLaughlinDisciplinary Secretary Terry LeydenApplications are now being taken for the coming season for U12 Girls, U14 Girls, U16 Girls, U18 Girls and Ladies, closing date of applications is the 1 March.The League is also running a First Aid Course and a Child Protection Course within the next 2 to 3 weeks. Please contact Brid McGinty on 087-9940614 or e-mail mcgintybrid@hotmail.com for more information.SOCCER: DONEGAL WOMEN’S LEAGUE AGM was last modified: February 20th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Donegal Women’s League AGMlast_img read more


Category: xsavqgkv

first_imgDONEGAL SFC: A late, late free from Daire McDaid denied Naomh Muire a first ever senior championship win in a pulsating encounter in The Banks this evening..Naomh Muire flew out of the traps and played some superb football and raced into a SIX point lead.After fifteen minutes of play Gary Boyle’s side led were in total control but missed TWO glorious goal chances and unfortunately for them they would be left to rue them. Termon recovered brilliantly from Naomh Muire’s blistering start and scored SEVEN points on the trot to go in at half-time ahead.In the second-half both sides exchanged points before Termon found the net to go THREE ahead.It looked like that could’ve been the crucial score but Naomh Muire showed tremendous character and fought back to go ahead.It looked like they had earned a crucial, crucial win but there was late drama. A free awarded in injury-time gave Termon the opportunity to draw level and that’s what they done.Daire McDaid landed a great point considering the pressure they were under and levelled the game.Final score: Naomh Muire 0-15 Termon 1-12AGONY FOR NAOMH MUIRE AS LATE FREE DENIES THEM FIRST EVER SENIOR CHAMPIONSHIP WIN was last modified: August 22nd, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:newsSportlast_img read more


Category: xsavqgkv

first_imgThe signs for one of Ireland’s rarest birds is looking positive after a number were spotted in Falcarragh, Tory Island, Malin and Ballyliffin.The iconic corncrakeFifty years ago, the call of the Corncrake was an everyday part of life throughout Donegal.However, in the 1960s, the population plummeted dramatically. In recent years the birds, which migrate back to Ireland from Africa to breed each year, stood at just a few pairs in small coastal pockets and islands of Donegal, Connemara and Mayo.But last year saw an explosion in their population increase by 44% to 189 breeding pairs – 128 of which were recorded in Co Donegal.Corncrake fieldworker for Co Donegal, Marie Duffy, said the signs are looking positive for another increase in the corncrake population after a number were recorded in recent days.“We have a number of early recordings of the birds which is a very positive indication. Last year was a very good year with the 44% increase on 2012. “Timing is everything with the corncrake and if farmers can hold back on cutting for a couple of weeks then that would give young birds a better chance of survival,” she said.The upsurge in numbers of the rare bird can be directly linked to the setting up of the Corncrake Conservation Project was created over twenty years ago. It is now run by the National Parks and Wildlife Services, and the project staff carries out an annual breeding census.This involves locating calling male corncrakes as they arrive and seeking landowner collaboration to protect them in their chosen breeding habitat.Landowners are offered a range of agri-environmental schemes including the Corncrake Grant Scheme which offers compensation for mowing meadows late and in a slow controlled manner, encouraging the survival of corncrake chicks.Ms Duffy said she is hopeful the numbers of corncrakes leaving Ireland to make the long journey back to sub Saharan Africa at the end of August will be even great than last year. “That is the hope. We are receiving great support from the farming community and hopefully we can build on last year’s numbers and ensure than the corncrake is not only saved but continues to grow,” she said.HOPES HIGH FOR THREATENED CORNCRAKE AS BIRDS SPOTTED ACROSS DONEGAL was last modified: May 6th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:BallyliffinbreedingCorncrakedonegalFalcarraghMalinTorylast_img read more


Category: xsavqgkv

first_img Tags: AfroBasketAfroCANArnold KatabiFubagazellessilverbacks The Silverbacks are preparing for the upcoming AfroCan. (PHOTOS/FILE)The Uganda men and women Basketball national teams have entered camp ahead of their respective continental tournaments.The men’s team (Silverbacks) is gearing up for the upcoming 2019 AfroCan, the very first of its kind in Africa.For the Gazelles, they are slated to take part in the preliminaries of the 2019 AfroBasket which will run between June 26th and July 1st, in Kampala.The Gazelles will also be attempting to reach the finals of the 26th AfroBasket championships.FUBA Publicity and Marketing secretary Arnold Katabi confirmed that the two teams are already in camp at Africa Bible University in Lubowa.“The management reached an agreement with the African Bible University, Lubowa for us to have a residential training camp there, noted Katabi.“Both Gazelles & Silverbacks have checked into the University on Tuesday morning and that is where our full residential training camp will be held.”The African Bible University has come as an alternative after the Federation of Ugandan Basketball failed to secure the MTN Arena in Lugogo.It is understood that Lugogo is currently occupied by the National Netball team, She Cranes who are gearing up for the upcoming 2019 World Cup in Liverpool, England.The Silverbacks have already been boosted by the arrival of Brandon Davies who jetted into the country on Monday.Gazelles last featured at AfroBasket championship in 2015 after defeating Egypt to to seal a spot at the showpiece.The Gazelles last qualified for AfroBasket in 2015.Both the AfroBasket and AfroCan championships have one slot for the winners of the Zone V Championship.The players currently in campSilverbacks Provisional squadBackcourt: Josh Johnson (City Oilers), Tonny Drilleba (City Oilers), Jimmy Enabu (City Oilers), Syrus Kiviiri (Power), Robinson Odoch (City Oilers), Mark Opiyo (Warriors).Frontcourt: Steven Omony (City Oilers), Joseph Ikong (Power), David Deng Kongor (UCU Canons), John Deng Geu (North Dakota State, USA), James Okello (City Oilers), Geoffrey Soro (Power), Brandon Davies (Zalgiris Kaunas, Lithuania), Stanley Mugerwa (Warriors), Daniel Manoja (JKL Dolphins), Ivan Lumanyika (JKL Dolphins).Gazelles SquadBackcourt: Flavia Oketcho (JKL Lady Dolphins), Judith Nansobya (KCCA), Rita Imanishimwe (JKL Lady Dolphins), Brenda Ekone (Nkumba Lady Marines)Frontcourt: Jamila Nansikombi (JKL Lady Dolphins), Zainah Lokwameri (UCU Lady Canons), Sarah Ageno (UCU Lady Canons), Priscilla Abbei (UCU Lady Canons), Claire Lamunu (Kouvottari, Finland), Hope Akello (JKL Lady Dolphins ), Martha Soigi (KCCA Leopards), Urysla Cotton Kerenza (BA London Lions).Comments last_img read more


Category: xsavqgkv

first_imgThe very severe cyclonic storm (Titli) caused heavy to very heavy rainfall in Ganjam, Gajapati, Puri districts of Odisha but no casualties or major damage were reported.As per IMD report, ‘Titli’ crossed north Andhra Pradesh and south coast near Palasa in Srikakulam district to the southwest of Gopalpur in Odisha between 4.30AM to 5.30AM at wee hours of Thursday. Gopalpur experienced wind of 126 kilometers per hour at 4.30AM. At 5.30 AM the wind speed went down to 102 kilometer per hour.This cyclonic storm sustained wind speed of 140-150 kilometers per hour with gusting wind of 165 kilometers per hour during landfall near Palasa.According Special Relief Commissioner (SRC) of Odisha, Bishnupad Sethi, Titli cyclone affected Ganjam, Khurda, Puri, Jagatsinghpur, Gajapati, Kendrapara, Bhadrak and Balasore districts of the State. It caused heavy to very heavy rainfall in Ganjam, Gajapati and Puri districts.Some thatched or asbestos houses, street lights as well as road blockage because of falling trees was reported from parts of Ganjam district. But no injury to humans was reported till 9AM. Minor damage to power and communication has been reported from some parts of Ganjam district, official sources said.Around three lakh people were evacuated to safe places in coastal districts of Odisha for the ‘Titli’ cyclone. Around two lakh of them were of vulnerable areas of Ganjam district. One thousand one hundred and twelve relief camps were opened to shelter evacuees. They were also sheltered at 879 multipurpose cyclone shelters. In Ganjam district, 108 pregnant women were shifted to hospitals. In Jagatsinghpur district number of shifted pregnant women was 18.Odisha was well prepared to face the cyclone. As per Mr Sethi, 30 district emergency operation centers were activated to respond to untoward incidents. Three hundred power boats were kept ready with crew. All schools, colleges and anganwadi kendras in the State will remain closed till October 12.Thirteen NDRF teams were deployed in Ganjam (2 teams), Gajapati, Puri (2 teams), Kendrapada, Nayagarh, Bhadrak, Jagatsinghpur, Balasore, Jajpur, Khurda and Sambalpur districts. ODRAF teams were deployed in nine districts, Ganjam, Puri, Jagatsinghpur, Khurda, Cuttack, Balasore, Mayurbhanj, Boudh, Kalahandi. Fire services teams were in high alert throughout the State.The situation is being closely monitored at different levels, said Mr Sethi.last_img read more


Category: xsavqgkv

first_imgCut most species of flatworm in half, and you end up with two flatworms. The front half will grow a new tail and, more impressively, the back half will grow a new head—complete with a fully functioning brain. But a few species of these worms mysteriously lack this ability, at least when it comes to regrowing a head. Now, three teams of researchers have not only zeroed in on the biological reason for this limitation, they’ve also managed to restore the worms’ full regenerative abilities by manipulating a single genetic pathway.The worms in question are known as planarians. Usually about a centimeter long, they live under rocks in freshwater ecosystems such as streams and ponds. Why some planarians can so easily regenerate a head but others can’t is a question that has long puzzled scientists. “This is really just a classic problem in the field,” says Phillip Newmark, a biologist at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Hoping to study possible molecular mechanisms behind the difference, he dispatched his postdoc James Sikes into the field to search for specimens of Procotyla fluviatilis, the only North American species of planarian that can’t regenerate its head. “He thought it would be easy!” remembers Sikes, who now runs his own lab at the University of San Francisco in California. After months of scouring the country for the tiny freshwater creatures, he finally tracked down a colony in southern Illinois. From there, he moved the worms to the lab and began chopping them to bits.The first step was to pinpoint where exactly P. fluviatilis’s head regeneration process went awry. Sikes and Newmark confirmed that the worms’ wounds healed properly after being cut in two and that the cells in their tail fragments were still able to divide. “What seemed to be not working was the decision that says, ‘make a head’ versus ‘make a new tail,’ ” Newmark says. That fundamental choice is governed by a molecular process known as Wnt signaling. By directing the activity of a protein called β-catenin, Wnt signaling tells developing cells what they should be when they grow up. If an amputated worm dials up Wnt signaling and produces a lot of β-catenin, it will regrow a tail. If it dials back Wnt signaling and β-catenin levels, however, it ends up growing a new head. Newmark and Sikes’s P. fluviatilis tail fragments couldn’t seem to activate this genetic switch either way.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)This discovery “led to a really simple experiment,” Newmark says. If he and Sikes knocked down the amount of β-catenin in a P. fluviatilis tail fragment, maybe they could trick it into regrowing a head. And to their amazement, that’s exactly what happened. By disrupting the one gene responsible for β-catenin production, they were able to restore P. fluviatilis’s ability to regenerate a lost head. “I didn’t believe it when I saw it,” Sikes admits. “Basically you’re reversing a million years of evolution.”As it turned out, Sikes and Newmark weren’t the only scientists interested in figuring out the secrets of flatworm regeneration. At the same time that they were conducting their experiments on P. fluviatilis in Illinois, a team of scientists in Europe was manipulating Wnt signaling and rescuing head regeneration in an entirely different species of planarian called Dendrocoelum lacteum. And on the other side of the world, Japanese scientists were reaching similar conclusions about β-catenin’s role in preventing head regeneration in Phagocata kawakatsui, a distant cousin of the European and North American planarians. The results of all three experiments are published today in Nature.”There’s a European species, there’s an American species, and there’s a Japanese species. This is as broadly geographic a sample as you can possibly define, and all three laboratories independently reached the same conclusion,” says Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado, a planarian biologist at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research in Kansas City, Missouri, who was not involved in any of the studies. The teams’ complementary results show that a defect in Wnt signaling “seems to be a very easy way to lose head regeneration,” agrees Elly Tanaka, a biologist at the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden in Germany who studies limb regeneration in vertebrates like salamanders.The next step, scientists from all the teams agree, is to figure out why these three species lost the ability to grow new heads. “Because of ‘survival of the fittest,’ one might assume that actually everything out there should be regenerating,” says Jochen Rink, a biologist at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden who led the European team. Newmark concurs, “Why would you lose this ability, which seems like it would be so useful?”Reproductive differences between planarians that can regenerate their heads and those that can’t may offer some clues, Sikes suggests. When head-regenerating planarians are cut in half, their sex organs melt away and are reabsorbed into their bodies. Freed of the pressure to continually produce eggs and sperm, the flatworms likely have more energy to direct toward regeneration. Besides, they’ll have plenty of chances to reproduce once all their parts grow back.Planarians that can’t regenerate their heads, however, typically reproduce only once in their lives. “You don’t want to miss that shot,” even if you’ve just been cut in half, Sikes says. It’s possible, he speculates, that the molecular signal that directs planarians like P. fluviatilis to keep their sexual organs around after their heads are amputated may also interfere with regeneration. “It’s kind of a tradeoff between, do I want to regenerate or do I want to hang around and reproduce?” Sikes says.However these differences evolved, the Nature papers all support the idea that regeneration isn’t something that a few species independently evolved. Rather, it may be something that the rest of us have lost. The capacity crops up in nearly every phyla of life of Earth, suggesting to scientists that our common ancestor may have had regenerative abilities. Even humans can do it under the right circumstances; for example, Sikes says, children under the age of 2 can regenerate missing fingertips. So now that scientists can restore flatworms’ vanished regenerative abilities, might they be able to do the same for other kinds of animals, such as humans? “It’s a fanciful idea, but it’s now one that’s somewhat supported by the evidence in these three papers,” Sánchez says.Sikes is more cautious. “Will humans regenerate as well as the planarians? Never.” Still, he says, the new studies show that “even though an animal can’t regenerate, the underlying ability is latent. It’s in there, potentially. … It’s just a matter of figuring out how to unlock it.”last_img read more


Category: xsavqgkv

first_imgFormer India captain Anil Kumble said he was not in favour of shifting the Indian Premier League (IPL) out the country.”IPL is a global brand which brings in a lot of revenue to the country. It should not be shifted,” he said on Wednesday.The legendary leg-spinner, who played in 132 Tests and 271 ODIs, led the Royal Challengers Bangalore to the final of the second edition of the cash-rich league in 2009.Last week, the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) secretary Anurag Thakur threatened to move the next edition of the league abroad.The IPL was twice played outside India, both in assembly election years. In 2009, it was moved to South Africa for the entire duration and in 2014, the league was shifted to the United Arab Emirates for the first 15 days.The ongoing ninth edition has seen many PILs being filed by various outfits. The board was forced to move 12 matches out of drought-hit Maharashtra on Bombay High Court’s directive after a PIL was filed claiming that a huge quantity of water was being used to maintain various cricket stadiums in the state.(With PTI inputs)last_img read more