Month: July 2019

Month: July 2019

first_imgThe Brexit process could see disabled people who were born on the continent but have lived here for many years unable to secure permanent residency in the UK, because they have never been able to work.UK law says citizens of the European Economic Area (EEA)* cannot secure permanent residence – and apply for British citizenship – unless they can show they have lived for at least five years in this country as a job seeker, worker, student, or self-employed person, or they are economically “self-sufficient”.Students and those who are self-sufficient must also show they have comprehensive private health insurance.The concerns were raised at a workshop in London this week, part of a project** that aims to provide information on how the final deal between the European Union (EU) and the UK government might impact on people’s rights.The government has pledged to protect the rights of EU nationals already living in the UK, but only if the EU grants similar protection to British citizens living in other EU states.But many EEA nationals are worried that agreement might not be reached between the two sides, so they want to secure UK residency rights before the country leaves the EU.Disabled journalist and activist Christiane Link told the workshop that she is helping run a Facebook group dedicated to supporting EEA citizens who want to secure UK residency rights.Many of them have been living in the UK for many years, but were born abroad.Some of those struggling to secure residency rights are disabled people who have not been able to work, and have claimed out-of-work disability benefits.Another group affected is carers, whose contribution is not treated by the UK government as work.Professor Anna Lawson, head of the Centre for Disability Studies and the new Disability Law Hub at the University of Leeds, told the workshop that this was one of the “hugely important issues that we need to be engaged in” as disabled people and disabled people’s organisations, as the government prepares for Brexit.Link told Disability News Service: “It will mainly affect people who are not working or didn’t work long enough. You must have worked for five years continuously.”A German citizen, she has been living in the UK for 10 years but will not have a problem securing residency rights after Brexit because she has worked for more than five years.But she said that this will not apply to many other disabled EEA citizens.And although the UK government may not directly force them to leave the country, it could refuse to continue paying them the benefits they need to survive.She said: “If you deny people who are disabled access to benefits then they are virtually unable to live here, so that is indirectly kicking them out of the country.”One of those affected is 41-year-old Yragael Drouet (pictured, talking to Link at the workshop), who came to the UK from France as a four-year-old child with his mother and has lived here ever since, and has received out-of-work disability benefits.He believes there are many disabled people who are EEA citizens and face the same barriers that he now faces in securing UK residency rights.He said: “The state obviously believes that I was unable to do full-time work so surely there should be some sort of get-out clause for disabled people [like me].”He says that if he is denied free healthcare he would have to return to France.He said: “I am 41 and I came here with my mother when I was four. It would be crazy. I have family there but I have nowhere to live.”He does not believe the UK government would allow this to happen “maliciously” but he fears that “it is something we are walking into” without realising.The Home Office website says that reasons to reject applications for permanent residence include “failure to supply evidence of exercising a treaty right as a job seeker, worker, self-employed person, self sufficient person, or student”.A Home Office spokesman said: “The rights of EU nationals living in the UK remain unchanged while we are a member of the European Union.“The home secretary has been clear that she wants to protect the status of EU nationals already living here, and the only circumstances in which that wouldn’t be possible is if British citizens’ rights in European member states were not protected in return.“There is no requirement to register for documentation certifying permanent residence to confirm this status.”He said the requirement for comprehensive sickness insurance is set out in the EU’s free movement directive and applies to all member states.But Link pointed out that the European Commission stated in 2012 that the UK government did not treat entitlement to free NHS treatment as equivalent to comprehensive sickness insurance, and that this “breaches EU law”.The Home Office had not been able to respond to this point by noon today (Thursday) because of yesterday’s terrorist incident in Westminster.Link added: “In general, I think it would be good if the EU would have made better provisions for disabled people (not only those who are working) but most of the issues right now like comprehensive sickness insurance and carer status are caused by the interpretation of the UK, not by the EU.”A petition calling for the system of qualifying for permanent residency to be reformed – including scrapping the requirement for disabled people and carers to have comprehensive sickness insurance – has secured nearly 35,000 signatures.*The EEA includes all EU countries as well as Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. EEA membership allows these three countries to be part of the EU’s single market, which allows free movement of goods, capital, services and people between member states**The Brexit Takeaways project is organising events in London, Northern Ireland, Gibraltar and Belgium to provide information on how the different options for a Brexit deal could impact on their rights. The project is led by the European Citizen Action Service, New Europeans, the European Disability Forum and the EU Rights Cliniclast_img read more



Month: July 2019

first_imgKYLE Amor insists the opportunity to walk out at Wembley in the Ladbrokes Challenge Cup final is all the ammunition St Helens need to defeat Leeds Rhinos in the semi-final on Friday July 31 (8.00pm) at the Halliwell Jones Stadium.St Helens, who have lifted Rugby League’s oldest Cup 12 times, last appeared at Wembley in 2008 where they were victorious over Hull FC.“The motivation is already there to get a chance to play at Wembley,” he said. “We owe it to each other as players, our coaching staff and the fans to put in a good performance against the form team in the competition.“We want to put a few wrongs right after two disappointing games against them this season and ultimately get to the final in August and kick on from there.”Amor played for Leeds in 2010 but that will count for nothing on Friday.“A few years ago I always wanted to show them that they were wrong in letting me go, but after a few years of thinking about the reasons why they let me go, I just treat it as no bigger game than as if we’re playing Warrington or Wigan,” he said. “It’s always nice when you do beat your old team, but it’s not like I go into the game bitter or angry towards them.“I’m a St Helens player and all I care about is getting through to the final with this group of players I’ve grown to love and respect.”Tickets for the Ladbrokes Challenge Cup Semi Final remain on sale from the Ticket Office at Langtree Park, by calling 01744 455 052 or online here.last_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgSAINTS have signed dynamic and powerful back rower Zeb Taia until the end of the 2019 season.Experienced in the NRL, Super League and on the International stage, he is versatile and will add leadership to Keiron Cunningham’s side.Born in Auburn in New South Wales, Taia played junior for Enfield Federals and St Clair Comets before being picked up by the Parramatta Eels.He then moved to Newcastle Knights in 2007; a club he stayed with until he signed for Catalans Dragons in 2012.Zeb was a standout performer in Perpignan and after being named in the Super League Dream Team in 2015 opted to return to NRL with the Gold Coast Titans.All in all, the 32-year-old has played more than 210 first grade games – including five at International level.He captained the Cook Islands in the 2013 Rugby League World Cup and also appeared at Test level for New Zealand.Saints Head Coach Keiron Cunningham said: “We’re delighted to have signed a player of Zeb’s calibre and he will bolster our squad immediately. He is powerful, possesses a great offload and like our other signings this season, will bring big game experience to the Saints.”As a result of the move, Saints have allowed second rower Joe Greenwood to take up a contract in the NRL with the Gold Coast Titans.The 23-year-old has agreed a deal after originally joining the Saints from Saddleworth Rangers in 2011.Keiron added: “We wouldn’t want to stand in the way of any player wishing to ply their trade elsewhere and Joe has been given a good opportunity at the Gold Coast.“It’s always difficult to lose a homegrown player and personally I will be sad to see him leave. I’ve worked hard with Joe to develop his game and help him grow as a person – and he has done just that.“Hopefully, one day after a successful NRL career, he will pull on the Red V again.”Joe played 77 times for the Saints after making his debut against his hometown Oldham in 2012.last_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgThe star met our Junior Members on Tuesday and also told us how excited he is to finally make his bow.Tickets for the clash are available from the Ticket Office at the Totally Wicked Stadium, by calling 01744 455 052 or online here.last_img