Month: January 2021

Month: January 2021

first_imgSaint Mary’s College Stand Up to Cancer Club is encouraging cancer patients, survivors and caregivers to “Don’t Stop Believing.” This Journey-inspired theme will provide the atmosphere for the club’s dance for cancer patients, family and community members tonight at 6 p.m. in Haggar Parlor. Junior Devon Graham, coordinator of the prom, said this night was a way to give patients and loved ones the opportunity to recreate missed experiences. “Unfortunately a lot of cancer patients miss out on really important events like prom, weddings and reunions,” Graham said. Graham said she developed the idea for a prom when volunteering at Memorial Hospital last semester. “They had mentioned that they wanted to do something for the patients, like a dance,” she said. “I had wanted to do a dance for my club anyway, but never really thought about combining the two. Then I thought, ‘Prom.’” She said the evening will feature prom traditions including evening gowns, decorations and the election of a prom king and queen. The club has also hired a DJ to play family-friendly music which will appeal to dancers from age three to 50, Graham said. “We have DJ 3J coming, and we met with him and said we need all kinds of music for all ages,” Graham said. “There will be the dorky Justin Bieber and Miley Cyrus to oldies.” Grahman said local organizations have also helped to make the evening very special. “We’ve had tons of gently used formal gowns donated, so it’s been pretty awesome,” she said. “[And] we’re getting flowers completely donated, so we don’t have to pay for [much, thanks to donations].” While the club volunteers mainly at Memorial Hospital, Graham said cancer patients and survivors from all over the Michiana area are welcome. “We didn’t want to close it down to other people,” she said. “We want everyone to feel welcome to come.” Overall, Graham said the theme of Journey’s song “Don’t Stop Believing” is a perfect way to summarize her hopes for the night. “It’s just a night for everyone to forget what they are going through — their troubles — and just celebrate life and have fun,” she said.last_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgTags: Editors Six new editors will join The Observer’s Editorial Board in 2014-15 and one current editor will retain her spot, incoming Editor-in-Chief Ann Marie Jakubowski announced Friday.Sophomores Lesley Stevenson, Mary Green, Wei Lin and Gabriela Leskur and juniors Allie Tollaksen and Keri O’Mara will assume positions on the Editorial Board after Spring Break. Junior Kelly Konya will continue as Saint Mary’s Editor, no longer interim.Stevenson, a resident of Breen-Phillips Hall and native of Memphis, Tenn., will serve as News Editor. Majoring in film, television and theatre with a minor in journalism, ethics and democracy, Stevenson joined The Observer in fall 2012 and has since covered this year’s ND Forum on Women in Leadership and the 2014 student government election.Green hails from Tampa, Fla., and lives in Pangborn Hall. She majors in film, television and theatre and English, with a minor in journalism, ethics and democracy. Green will serve as Sports Editor after covering women’s basketball and men’s swimming and spending the past year as Interhall Editor.Lin, a resident of Knott Hall and native of New York, will serve as Photo Editor. He majors in accounting, economics and Chinese and joined The Observer as a photographer in November 2012. He became a nightly photo editor in March 2013 and also writes for the News department intermittently.Leskur will take over as Viewpoint Editor. A native of Cleveland, and resident of Farley Hall, she majors in the Program of Liberal Studies with an anthropology minor. Leskur currently writes for The Observer’s Scene Department, including a popular recurring column titled “Gabriela’s Double Dog Dare.”Tollaksen, from Racine, Wis., majors in psychology and minors in poverty studies. The Farley Hall resident will be Scene Editor after joining the staff last year and serving as Associate Scene Editor this semester.O’Mara, a resident of Welsh Family Hall, will serve as Graphics Editor. Hailing from Albany, N.Y., she majors in graphic design and minors in peace studies. O’Mara has done design work for the Arts and Letters Office of Communication, Scholastic Magazine, Junior Class Council and the student peace conference.Konya will continue as Saint Mary’s Editor. The Le Mans Hall resident and Twinsburg, Ohio, native majors in English writing and English literature and has experience as Associate Saint Mary’s Editor last semester and current interim editor.last_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgAdam Cowden, a 2012 Notre Dame graduate, has received one of 40 Gates Cambridge Scholarships to study at the University of Cambridge starting Oct. 1.“An opportunity to study at Cambridge wouldn’t have been possible without the scholarship,” Cowden said. “There’s a really cool opportunity [at Cambridge] to build community and collaborate to solve the world’s issues.”Cowden, a political science major and philosophy, politics and economics minor, described the intensive, thorough selection process that narrows a field of 800 to a final group of 40.According to Cowden, the departments at Cambridge create a shortlist of applicants of about 200. The Gates committee then review and select about 100 for interviews in Seattle. Cowden said that the Gates committee only selected 90 this year.At the interviews, Cowden said the experience was friendly.“They go out of their way to encourage you to enjoy Seattle and engage with the other finalists,” he said.“You have a panel interviewing you. Mine was social sciences. [The panel] includes some professors from Cambridge, past Gates Cambridge Scholars and others,” Cowden said. “They asked what I thought about policy and if I drafted a policy, what would it be and why.”Cowden said his initial reaction was a mix of surprise and relief.“I didn’t think that my interview went well,” he said. “I was really surprised and happy. I studied in London while at Notre Dame, and I’m excited to go back.”At University of Cambridge, Cowden will pursue a master of philosophy in planning, growth and regeneration. He said he wants to apply his studies in the future.“In the short term, I could be interested in going on to a Ph.D. Right now, I’m living at Su Casa Catholic Workers,” he said. “I think I would like to work in public policy that regenerates economically desperate neighborhoods. Or else, I could end up finding something else and being completely surprised.”Cowden thanked specific members of the Notre Dame community for helping him along his journey to Cambridge.“I would say that certain people as opposed to classes or a major helped me the most,” Cowden said. “I took a Latin American politics class with Fr. Tim Scully. I had to write a paper in that class that became the inspiration of my senior thesis.“Dr. Jeff Thibert at CUSE really helped me through the actual scholarship process.”Beyond the application process and classes, Cowden said the community aspect of dorm life at Notre Dame helped him along the way.“We had a housekeeper in Sorin, Senja Begic. She was basically my second mom,” he said. “There was one time that I fell on God Quad and she tended to my wounds for two weeks. She helped us get through college.”Cowden said he would encourage other students to apply for scholarships following college.“Number one, make sure that you have a good reason for applying to the program,” he said. “Second of all, if you do have those reasons in place, don’t sell yourself short. Don’t think there’s no chance at getting it. I thought I had a very small chance, and it worked out for me.”Tags: Adam Cowden, Class of 2012, Gates Cambridge Scholarshiplast_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgNotre Dame engineering professor Gary Bernstein was recently awarded the first-ever Master of Innovation Award from the Indiana Economic Development Corporation and Forbes, Inc. for his development of quilt packaging technology.Bernstein, who works as the Frank Freimenn professor of electrical engineering and associate director of the Center for Nanoscience and Technology at Notre Dame, said he and his colleagues began developing quilt packaging technology in 2001 by working with integrated circuits, small computer chips that facilitate the function of cell phones, refrigerators and countless other devices that use electronics.“It would be as if you wanted one cell phone to talk to another cell phone so you had a link between them, but you knew that link was slow,” Bernstein said. “So that information would go between those two things slower than you’d like them to.”Bernstein said he noticed the paths through which integrated circuits send electrical signals was less than ideal and responded by developing quilt packaging, which he said eliminates the space between integrated circuits and thus rapidly hastens the pace at which circuits can communicate with each other.“Myself, together with my colleagues, came up with this new idea that I call ‘quilt packaging,’ because it’s like a quilt,” Bernstein said. “We want to take the chips in the packages, get rid of the packages, push them next to each other and put little tiny pieces of metal that stitch them together at their edges. Then you can form an array or quilt of multiple chips that communicate with each other much better because they don’t have to go out of the package and into another package.“That’s not done. It’s just not done. It’s a new concept. There are elements of it that are done but not in the way that I’ve described it.”According to the Notre Dame press release, Bernstein received the award at the “Forbes Reinventing America: The Innovation Summit” in Indianapolis on Nov. 13. Indiana Secretary of Commerce Victor Smith presented him with the award before Bernstein went on to make his speech.Quilt packaging technology is currently in the process of being commercialized by Innovation Park at Notre Dame, with the University owning the rights, according to the press release. Four patents have already been issued, with a fifth in the works, while the technology is being licensed and incorporated.“It [was] incorporated in 2009, so it’s actually five years old,” Bernstein said. “We’re doing quite well, getting a lot of traction and have working relationships with several major companies. We just sold our first commercial license for a product that will come out in the next couple years.“It takes a while to develop new integrated circuits, so the fact that a product is licensed and should be coming out in a couple years is really exciting.”Tags: engineering, Forbes, Gary Bernstein, Indiana Economic Development Corporation, Master of Innovation Award, quilt packaginglast_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgCourtesy of Gwen O’Brien Saint Mary’s will host the 23rd annual Hypatia Day this Saturday, a day for middle school girls to be inspired by the realms of math and science.Saint Mary’s will host the 23rd annual Hypatia Day this Saturday for seventh grade girls from local South Bend schools to fight the stereotype that math and science are male-dominated fields. With the assistance of current students, professors and high school students, the day will be centered around exposing both young girls and their parents to the many opportunities available in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) fields for women.Hypatia Day was first organized in 1991 by Sr. Miriam Patrick Cooney, professor emerita of mathematics, director of media relations Gwen O’Brien said.Hypatia Day is named for the first known female mathematician, Hypatia of Alexandria, who was the daughter of ancient Greek mathematician and philosopher Theon, O’Brien said. According to legend, Hypatia’s father taught her mathematics during a period in Greek history when young girls were excluded from education.According to Socrates, Hypatia’s home and lecture room were the two favorite gathering places for her scholarly friends, as she was one of the most-loved teachers and well-respected scholars of her time.Assistant professor of mathematics Kristin Kuter said Hypatia Day is mainly geared towards seventh grade girls and their parents.Some of the participating schools include Indiana schools such as Boston Middle School in La Porte, Discovery Middle School in Granger, Grissom Middle School in Mishawaka, Lincoln Jr. High in Plymouth, New Prairie Middle School in New Carlisle and St. Joseph Grade School in South Bend.“The focus of the event is to encourage the seventh graders to continue to pursue an education in math and science, while informing their parents on how to support their daughters in that goal,” Kuter said.Kuter said this year’s Hypatia Day will feature hands-on activities run by STEM-related clubs on campus.“This year we have sessions organized by the biology, chemistry, engineering, math and computer science, nursing and physics clubs,” Kuter said. “During these sessions, the seventh graders will interact with college women preparing for careers in the STEM fields and will be encouraged to view one another as potential physicians, research scientists, actuaries, engineers, statisticians, data analysts, technology experts and the like.”Beginning at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, students and their parents will arrive in Carroll Auditorium for a welcome presentation by Kuter. Then, director of patient logistics at University of Chicago Medicine Emily Lowder will deliver the keynote address, “Following Their Footsteps and Tales from the Journey” to all participants.Kuter said throughout the day, middle school students will have the opportunity to work in the lab with college and high school students who are preparing for a future in the STEM fields. Kuter said parents will also be able to speak with Saint Mary’s students about their future careers, attend panel discussions and take part in campus tours.“The parents attend a panel discussion focusing on what curriculum best prepares a student for college and keeps all of her options open. Another session will provide information on financial preparation for a college education,” she said.Kuter said she believes Hypatia Day is important not only for young girls at their current age, but for the growth of their interest in the subjects over time.“This event is important to the community because research has shown that girls of this age greatly benefit from extra attention and encouragement for their interest in studies which require a high degree of training in mathematics and science,” Kuter said.Senior Audrey Kiefer said she believes Hypatia Day to be one of the best ways Saint Mary’s can engage with the local community.“Though I haven’t participated in the day personally, I know some of my fellow classmates who are science majors always say that the young girls truly appreciate the opportunity to experiment in the labs and make connections with college students,” Kiefer said.Kiefer said she finds it essential to begin empowering young women at an early age in the same way that Saint Mary’s empowers women throughout their collegiate years.“When all of [the current students] find Saint Mary’s to be such a great place for expanding our minds and planning to make a difference, it only makes sense that we host a day like this to show young girls that anything is possible, no matter what field of study,” Kiefer said.Tags: hypatia, Hypatia Day, Kristin Kuter, Saint Mary’s hypatia day, STEMlast_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgThe Notre Dame class of 2019 had not officially set foot on campus or even received their dorm assignments when one of their own, Rebecca Draper Townsend, died in a car accident July 2 in Danbury, Connecticut.A resident of Brookfield, Connecticut, Townsend was a graduate of Immaculate High School and was going to start her freshman year this fall.In response to her death, the class of 2019 began an ongoing commitment to honor her memory.Incoming freshman Taja Reynolds said she and many of her classmates had gotten to know Townsend and were talking to her online.“We got pretty close to her so when we heard that she passed, we all immediately wanted to do something for her, let people know how great she was,” she said.According to Reynolds, a group of freshmen wanted to do something tangible to celebrate their friend. Freshman Nick Bufalino suggested creating and selling a bracelet in Rebecca’s memory to benefit She’s The First, a charity granting scholarships to impoverished girls in developing countries. Townsend worked closely with She’s The First, and started a chapter of the organization at her high school.“As soon as we heard about the loss of Rebecca, our classmate, the class of 2019 knew that we wanted to do something to honor and celebrate the selfless love that Rebecca embodied,” Bufalino said.Bufalino said they raised money for the bracelets through the website GoFundMe. Classmates raised more than $4600, Bufalino said, and they plan to sell the wristbands for $3 each at the start of the school year.“The positive reception and support from the Notre Dame family has truly been overwhelming,” he said. “As a first generation student at Notre Dame, I am so thankful to be part of a community that goes beyond the call of duty to show genuine support in a time of need.”Another member of the class of 2019 and friend of Townsend, Pamela Udoye said the actual fundraising was only part of their goal to spread Rebecca’s legacy.“We shared her story with as many friends and family as possible because Rebecca was such a special and amazing person,” Udoye said.Sophomore Travis Gayle also helped spread the word about the bracelet fundraiser on social media and said the experience demonstrated the power of the Notre Dame community to come together for a common cause.“As a freshman, coming in was intimidating whether anyone admits it or not,” Gayle said. “This was one of the silver linings in a cloud that gave me a chance to show the freshman that what we exemplify is family and togetherness at Notre Dame.”In addition to the bracelet campaign, the class of 2019 will make a quilt with messages of support for the Townsend family in memory of Townsend as part of official Welcome Weekend programming. On Sunday from 1:30 to 5:30 p.m, the quilt will be assembled in a tent on North Quad and all members of the class of 2019 community are welcomed to participate. Townsend will also be commemorated at the first year mass welcoming new students on August 23.Tags: Class of 2019, Rebecca Townsend, Welcome Weekendlast_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgStudent government and the Gender Relations Center (GRC) are partnering to host the “Cost of Silence” week. Formerly known as “Race Relations Week,” sophomore Kaleem Minor, student government director of diversity and inclusion, said the new title was meant to encompass more issues on campus.“We feel like something bigger on this campus is what it means to be silent for your friend, what it means to not be an ally,” Minor said. “What’s the cost [of] that? And not just allyship, but being accountable, being involved with the issue. Because this issue is not something that one person, one group, one organization can fix. It’s something that everybody has to chip in and help [solve].”The week includes events such as apparel handouts, T-shirt distributions, a screening of the film “Sisters of Selma: Bearing Witness for Change,” a pledge signing and a speaker series.“We’re trying to encourage people to know their role, understand their role and figure out their role,” Minor said. “While our University’s great, there’s a lot of things that aren’t great for … students that aren’t a majority in any sense — whether it be race, sexual orientation, religion, socioeconomic status and gender identity.”Minor said his department — diversity and inclusion — put a lot of thought into the week’s events to make sure they were as successful as possible. He said they focused on events that would engage students and incite discussion, not just through the panels, but from events as simple as T-shirt distributions. The T-shirts advertise statistics on women’s rights, race and sexual identity, among others.The event Minor said he is most excited about is the speaker series.“The goal of this event and the reason I’m so excited about it is because you have these people who are experts in this field and understand what’s going on, talking to students and challenging students to get involved,” he said.The goal of the week, Minor said, is to get students thinking about how to act on the issues they care about the most.“A lot of students, from what I’ve heard, they want to change campus but they don’t know how,” he said. “We just talk about what they care about and why they care about it and encourage them to get involved … in any way because everybody has a role. “The general arching theme is accountability. How can you get involved? How can you change campus?”Minor said he remembers last year, his freshman year, when campus was especially hostile during election season.“I think now there’s an aura of being cordial, but not necessarily talking or having conversations,” he said. “I think there’s a deep and thorough need for that under the right circumstances, which is something we all have to come together and decide how to do.”In terms of racial relations and inclusion on campus, Minor said, there is definitely room for improvement. He said this week empowers students to bring up the issues they most care about. He said in conjunction with the GRC, student government hosts this week to serve as a platform for students to voice their opinions on how to make this University a more welcoming place for all, without exceptions.“We have some really powerful events [this week] that can really provoke some thought and discussion,” he said. “If we can get 20-25 people … to say, ‘Wow, I have an issue that I really care about and I want to get involved in fixing this’ … that’s a win to me.”Tags: Accountability, Cost of Silence, Diversity, Diversity and Inclusion, inclusion, Race relationslast_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgSleek melodies, bouncy beats and charming choreography will enliven Legends this Thursday during the “Aca–Off.” Four Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s a cappella groups are set to face off in this battle of voice at 9 p.m.The groups Harmonia, Unchained Melodies, The Echoes and Bellacappella will compete. The winner of the competition must best its competitors in three separate categories and will win a $500 reward.Senior Laura Eckert, member of the Notre Dame Christian a cappella group Unchained Melodies, said the Aca–Off is a way for a cappella groups to exhibit the music they have been rehearsing and bond through a mutual passion for singing.“There‘s going to be a lot of different musical styles there,” Eckert said. “It’s a really interesting way for all of the a cappella groups to come together and share our music.”The categories for this year’s event are ballads, throwbacks and chart–toppers. Each group has prepared four songs, one for each category, as well as a final “battle song.” The audience will choose the winner. The Aca–Off is expected to demonstrate a variety of musical styles while allowing the groups to engage with each other and a new audience, Eckert said.“Everyone tends to pick soloists who do great on a specific song because everyone has something unique to bring as far as voice goes,” she said. “What I really enjoy about Unchained Melodies is our purpose beyond just singing the songs. All of our songs have a really deep meaningful message. Sharing that message with a broader audience who wouldn’t necessarily come to one of our concerts will be great.”In addition to their work on–campus, Unchained Melodies also reaches out to the South Bend and Chicago communities to perform at nursing homes and homeless shelters, Eckert said.The Aca–Off allows each group to can gain experience with competitive singing. In addition, the Aca–Off helps Legends continue to build a relationship with student groups on campus. It also offers a chance to build community amongst the a cappella groups, senior and co–director of Saint Mary‘s group Bellacappella Franny Wall said.“I think our biggest takeaway will be experience performing in front of audiences, which is always beneficial,” Bellacappella co–director and senior Franny Wall said in an email. “It is also a great opportunity to get to know members from other groups and hear what kind of repertoire they are performing this semester.”To prepare for the Aca–Off, Bellacappella picked out music it has previously rehearsed on and also incorporated a new piece into its set.“Once we had all the songs chosen, it was just a matter of pulling them out regularly at rehearsals to keep them fresh in our minds and voices,” Wall said.Bellacappella also performs a full concert each semester and at various other events on and off campus, such as football tailgates and Board of Trustees dinners. Harmonia co–president and senior Claire Alexander said Aca–Off is an opportunity for the group to perform songs it may use for future concerts and to build community within Harmonia. Harmonia is Notre Dame’s only all-female a cappella group.“Of course Harmonia would love to win the event, but our main goal is to help build friendly, collaborative, fun relationships between the a cappella groups of Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s,” Alexander said in an email. “We also want to sound our best and use this event to reintroduce members we’re welcoming back from being abroad last semester.”Harmonia will also have a spring concert April 20 and recently performed at Junior Parents Weekend.“We always like having different performances throughout the semester before our main concert at the end of the semester,” senior and Harmonia member Molly Chen said in an email. “Competitions are an especially fun way for us to see what other groups have been working on and support them.”Editor’s Note: Molly Chen is Scene Writer for The Observer.Sophomore Mary Hope Clark, member of Notre Dame’s co–ed a cappella group The Echoes, said she hopes that the Aca–Off will help publicize the group and that the singers can use the event as a forum of support and pride.“We really want to show people what The Echoes are all about,” Clark said in an email. “We love getting to perform for students, so we just want to do our best and say, ‘Hey, we’re The Echoes. We’re doing what we love and we want to share our passion with you.’ “We also want to enjoy and support the other groups because all of the a cappella groups perform in many varied facets, so it’s rare that we all get to perform together.”The Echoes previously performed at the International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella (ICCA) at Ball State University and their spring concert will take place April 28.“The competition we did earlier in the year, the ICCAs, was a lot of fun and great experience, but all the groups, pardon one, weren’t from Notre Dame,” Clark said in an email. “It was incredible to interact with groups from different campuses, but there’s something special about singing with and celebrating your peers that makes us particularly excited about the Aca–Off.”Tags: a cappella, Aca-Off, Bellacapella, Harmonia, The Echoes, Unchained Melodieslast_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgJAMESTOWN – New York State Senator George Borrello is holding a Facebook LIVE Q&A Tuesday afternoon to explain more about his plan to reopen New York State.Last month, Borrello and Assemblyman Andy Goodell announced a plan that would re-open New York with a regional approach during the COVID-19 pandemic.Just last week, the two published a follow-up to the “Restarting New York” plan which details a new schedule for reopening business sectors based on their inherent risk levels and the ability to mitigate those risks.“With the progress we’ve made against the COVID-19 crisis, one of the biggest conversations happening in our state and nation right now is how to reopen our economy and get folks back to work in a way that will keep them safe and prevent future outbreaks,” said Senator Borrello in a post on Facebook. “Since we announced the plan two weeks ago, the topic of reopening New York’s economy has moved to the forefront and generated lots of questions.” Borrello is hosting the Facebook LIVE Q&A chat at 4 p.m. Those interested in watching can view the live video here. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more


Month: January 2021

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) WNY News Now File Image.DUNKIRK — The City of Dunkirk’s National Night Out Committee has moved the date of its annual National Night Out Celebration this year due to COVID-19.Officials say Night Out is now slated to happen on Tuesday, Aug. 25 with an alternate date for Tuesday, Sept. 1. National Night Out is traditionally on the first Tuesday in August.The Committee says they do not want to cancel the program but in order to keep everyone safe they will require that masks be worn by everyone in attendance and that social distancing is practiced. They will have safety precautions in place and theyt will separate the picnic tables around Washington Park so there is distance between citizens and families during the evening and they will keep them separated for the usual Movie that they end the night with.Police Officers and Firefighters will be on location and they will interact in a safe way with all that attend. The Night Out Committee wants to thank all people that come out for the event every year and we look forward to seeing all of you again this year and ask everyone to help them have a safe event.last_img read more


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