Month: April 2021

Month: April 2021

first_imgThere is a telling phrase tucked away at the end of the Subway article on page 9 this week. Brian Griffiths, MD of EIPC, the company which manages the buying for Subway’s franchisees says: “There is a prevalence of parking fines here (in the UK), which is reflected in costs.”A few weeks ago, Peter Coughlan, my local craft baker in Croydon, told me he had just had two parking fines, of £80 each, in a week, while one of his vans was delivering his goods. It is a typical occurrence happening all over the UK. But it is just not good enough. Parking and deliveries must be tackled in the House of Commons by the All Party Small Shops Group, thankfully set up by Jim Dowd MP (Labour). The Group is already making inroads.But I also believe it is time for the ingredients companies, millers and equipment companies that supply small shops to join in supporting them. Why leave your customers to struggle alone? Unlike you, they don’t have marketing people. Surely your expertise can help? And surely, when the Association of Ingredient Manufacturers (ABIM) and the National Association of British and Irish Millers (NABIM) meet regularly, you can appoint a lobbying committee to sit alongside technical, social or other committees? The National Association of Master Bakers (NA) and the Scottish Association are too small to be really effective, although the NA’s David Smith is working very hard alongside Mr Dowd. It is a reflection of the times we live in, but you only get anywhere these days if you lobby. The British Retail Consortium does a fantastic job of cross-party lobbying for the supermarkets. Time and again, I hear from craft bakers that all they want is a ‘level playing field’. No lobbying equals no level playing field – in fact, no level anything. There needs to be a whole change of culture in this country, with an ethos to support small shops via parking, via rates, via red tape. It exists in Europe, so why not over here?Of course we still want to shop in our supermarkets, but mums with young children and our ageing population also need community shops to be viable. Meanwhile, office workers should be able to buy sandwiches on their busy high streets without having to pay the built-in cost of parking fines.last_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_imgThe RHM group trumpeted “a significantly improved trading performance” in the second half of the year to 29 April. The full year pre-tax profit fell to £7.4m from £63.7m the year before.Although group sales grew 2.1% last year to £1.6bn, growth picked up in the second half and reached 3.7%, said RHM. Strong sales of Hovis, for example, helped to compensate for a fall in sales of branded cakes, especially in the first half.The cakes division’s sales fell 8.7% to £241m and underlying profit fell 27.5% to £13.2m. RHM said the second-half performance of Manor Bakeries was better than a year before despite “a disappointing” first half, including poor Mr Kipling cake sales.Mr Kipling sales fell 14.1% year-on-year in the first half and 8% in the second half, but RHM predicted that sales this financial year would at least match last year’s.Mr Kipling cakes are now free of artificial flavours and colourings, with some upgraded recipes and new packaging. In the second half, RHM switched £3m from advertising to in-store and other promotions to stimulate sales but added: “There remains, however, much to be done to realise the full potential of the Mr Kipling brand.”RHM’s bread bakeries division boosted turnover by 4.1% to £786m, with increased sales of Hovis and Hovis price rises. It said the division’s underlying profit increased 26.4% to £81.4m, with better pricing, restructuring and lower pension costs offset in part by the higher cost of supplying new convenience store customers and £11m of higher energy costs.New Hovis products including the crustless Hovis Invisible Crust loaf and demand for healthier products helped to increase the brand’s market share from 29.1% the year before to a record 31.6%.The flour business in the bakeries division increased sales to £140m from £134m the year before. RHM said that the impact of the closure of three old mills was more than offset by increased sales from its Wellingborough mill, which it bought in July 2005.last_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_imgBagels are well-known in this country, but their second-cousins-once-removed, bialys, are less so. Bialys are soft rolls topped with a tasty onion-breadcrumb mixture, that were the speciality of Bialystok in what is now Poland. Though both are Eastern European and Jewish in origin, they have a broader appeal. Both are relatively cheap to make, and can be sold for a premium price as a stand-alone speciality product, or split and used with any number of fillings for sandwiches.When we had our shop in London, we sold both products every day. Now that we have moved to East Sussex, we continue to sell them wholesale, and teach students how to make them on the Jewish Baking course at our Bakery School.Bagels (makes 12 large bagels or 24 mini bagels)Ingredients g %Organic strongwhite flour 680g 100Salt 15g 6Sugar 40g 2Milk powder 45g 7Barley malt syrup 20g 3Fresh yeast 12g 2Batter-style sourdough starter 290g 40Water 325g 47Method1. Mix all the ingredients together to form a stiff dough – adjust consistency as necessary.2. Scale pieces at 120g for large or 60g for minis. A3. Form doughpieces into thick ropes of around 20cm (8 inches) or half that size for minis.4. Wrap each large rope around the widest part of your hand, overlapping the ends in your palm, and roll on the work surface to seal. For mini-bagels, wrap the rope around the first three fingers of your hand. B5. Place on a tray and retard overnight. Allow the bagels to come to cool room temperature the next day.6. Boil the bagels for 10-20 seconds, pressing down on the tops to ensure they are immersed. If well-proved, the bagels will float to the surface of the water. C7. Return the boiled bagels to the tray, dress with seeds of your choice (or leave plain) and bake at 220°C for 20-25 minutes or until mahogany brown. DBialy Dough (makes 9 bialys)Ingredients g %Organic strong white flour 500g 100Coarse salt 13g 2.6Fresh yeast 8g 1.5Water 325g 65Onion ToppingIngredientsMedium onion 1Dried breadcrumbs 20gPoppy seeds for sprinklingMethod1. Mix ingredients together to form a stiff dough.2. Bulk-ferment for 3 hours, folding back after 1.5 hours.3. While the dough is bulk-fermenting, make the onion topping: mince the onion finely and add the breadcrumbs*. Mix thoroughly to combine and leave the topping to mellow at room temperature until ready to use.4. Scale pieces at 90g and mould round.5. Prove ambient for 30 minutes or until puffy. E6. Take each round in both hands, and pull apart slightly to form a thin well in the middle. F7. Place on a tray, or semolina-dusted peel.8. Smear a small amount of onion topping in the central well, spray the whole with water, and sprinkle with poppy seeds. G9. Bake at 220°C for 20 minutes or until golden. Hl Tip: Breadcrumbs are a great way to use up any left-over bread—-=== Got a query? ===Contact Elizabeth Weisberg by email on [email protected] Bakery is a small artisan wholesale bakery and school, based in East Sussexlast_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_imgA cake designer from Surrey has organised a fundraising event – Cakes For Haiti – in order to raise money for the country following the earthquake last month.The earthquake hit on the same day as cake designer Janet Mohapi-Banks’ birthday and she felt compelled to do something to help. She is encouraging everyone from businesses and organisations to schools and individuals to take part in National Cake Sale Day, on 26 March, by, for example, organising a cake sale and donating the proceeds to the DEC Haiti Earthquake Appeal. Bakeries could get involved by donating a portion of the proceeds from cakes sold on the day.Her website www.cakesforhaiti.org offers all kinds of advice, and posters can be downloaded from the site to help publicise the event.last_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_imgWhat next for cookies?Cupcakes versus fairy cakes, cookies versus biscuits, frosting versus icing… America is winning the transatlantic bakery battle and US-style cookies characterised by a large diameter and a soft, chewy texture are now within our borders. For inspiration from overseas, here are our top three cookie-makers cutting it Stateside1. Bringing your unspoken childhood dinner-reordering fantasy to fruition with the motto Eat Dessert First, Eleni’s in New York features novelty shaped cookies, made using bespoke cutters and iced by hand. Themes range from sports cookies to Oscars night celebrity cookies. When Eleni’s made Obama cookies during the 2008 Presidential race, election day reportedly saw its best-ever one-day takings. With a UK election likely on 6 May, would Gordon “anything with chocolate” Brown biscuits be a winner? elenis.com2. Can’t be bothered to come up with new recipes? Then let your customers decide! In Canada, the consumer is king at Toronto’s Sweet Flour Bake Shop, which has devised a way to bake them in just two minutes. Closer to an ice cream shop in spirit, you can create up to 15,000 combinations of cookie, with 23 dough mixes, from M&M’s to dried fig, and six choices of spread to sandwich your cookie. Healthy options include fresh fruit, yoghurt and granola to mix in. www.sweetflour.ca3.”Possibly the largest, most divine chocolate chip cookies in Manhattan” is the quote from The New York Times, flaunted on Levain Bakery’s website. The 6oz cookies look more akin to a scone or a rock cake. Online orders for the mix-and-match chocolate chip walnut, dark chocolate chocolate chip, oatmeal raisin and dark chocolate peanut butter chip cookies come wrapped in cellophane and topped with a blue ribbon. Also on offer is a 12-cookie gift box for $66. www.levainbakery.com Salford was the latest council this month to ban biscuits at meetings, leaving a £30,000 hole in sales of bourbons, custard creams and Rich Tea. Luckily for cookie makers, the category looks likely to withstand such swingeing government cost-cutting ahead.The cookie market in particular witnessed extremely good growth last year. In-store bakery (ISB) cookies were up over 10% in value and nearly a fifth in volume. “There has been a slight decline in total in-store bakery sales year-on-year, because ISB bakery is perceived as being more expensive than other areas of the store, so that’s not surprising,” says Gail Lindsay, marketing manager of Rich Products. “But within that, ISB cookies have performed particularly well, up around 11% year-on-year.”While the average price per pack dipped below £1, the growth has not been primarily promotion-driven, she believes, attributing increased sales to more households buying into cookies. “We’ve done some promotional activity, but no more than previous years. It’s about buying more when they go into the store and buying more often.”Tesco, which has the largest market share of cookies, with 32.7%, carried out a significant amount of work on its standard cookies, with recipe reformulation (flavours and salt levels) and packaging changes, contributing to a 58% rise on its standard range.”The supermarkets are getting better at catching that top-up shopping behaviour and that’s where the craft bakery market can really play a part, as a local shop, with a good range of products not by being left with nothing on-shelf and closing by 4pm in the afternoon.” says Lindsay.For those bakers looking to capitalise, there are lots of convenient options on the market. “Craft bakers who have not already caught on to the cookie craze may be wondering if they have missed the boat, but with value growth of around 11% in the market, there is still plenty of opportunity to take profitable advantage of the cookie trend,” says David Astles of bakery ingredients supplier CSM UK (formerly BakeMark UK). With thaw-and-serve, choc chip versus double choc chip, soft and chewy, scoop doughs, healthy options, cookie mixes and cookie pucks, there’s a lot to consider. But one thing’s for certain retailers won’t go far wrong with standard choc chip flavours, which are runaway category leaders.”With the documented sales of standard cookies showing a sustained growth within the market of 21% value and 29.9% volume (Kantar Superpanel, 52 w/e 27 December 2009), there is little evidence to suggest that this trend will be reversed, which means even those who are just starting out in the cookie market still have the potential to make good margins,” says Astles.One of CSM’s products that appears well-placed is its Readi-Bake better-for-you Apricot and Raisin Cookie, which has 53% less fat and 23% fewer calories than a standard choc chip cookie. Elsewhere, the giant biscuit bakers are leading the charge when it comes to marketing the reductions they have made in saturated fat a ripple-down effect that could have implications for all cookie and biscuit makers and retailers.A big flash on packs of United Biscuits (UBUK) brands, such as McVitie’s, currently communicates its 50% sat fat reduction, backed by a big-money six-week campaign. “McVitie’s is now worth over £231m, and is expected to become even more popular now that the saturated fat has been reduced by a further 50% across the McVitie’s portfolio,” says Sarah Heynen, marketing director, sweet biscuits at UBUK. “The campaign will tell consumers of the latest saturated fat reduction.”Brands hold off own-labelPackaged own-label cookies fell away badly compared with brands, seeing volumes drop nearly 15% and value down 3.5%. While volumes of branded cookies dipped too, down 3.8%, value held up well, boosting the branded cookies category by nearly 5%, with the average price paid per pack rising 5p. This has led to opportunities for brand-building with niche suppliers.Cornish biscuit manufacturer Furniss of Cornwall has had its most successful year since the company was taken over by Proper Cornish Food Company in 2006. With a turnover of £2m in 2009, it is now targeting £3m for 2010. Products with a strong provenance, such as its clotted cream shortbread an alternative to traditional Scottish shortbread, as well as the launch of a Rick Stein-branded savoury biscuit range, have been making inroads into the category and have helped to build export sales.”It has been successful for us, which is not to say the upper end of the savoury biscuit market is making a resurgence,” says marketing manager Mark Muncey. “Not an awful lot of people are doing new product development at the moment, so the fact that we’ve got something new is appealing. Certainly for the independents, what with Duchy Originals’ new arrangement to supply Waitrose, we are now selling into places that were happy with Duchy. We’re putting some money into new ideas, while the market is stagnating, to steal a small part of a very large market.”last_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_imgQ: Must we pay an employee their full salary while they are absent on jury service, and, if so, can we claim compensation?A: You are under no statutory obligation to pay an employee their normal salary while they undertake jury service and our ‘Leaves of Absence Policy’ reflects this, by saying that such payment can be made entirely at your discretion. The court will reimburse your employee for their travel and give them an allowance for subsistence. But if they will lose earnings while serving as a juror, because you are not paying them during this period, then they can complete a ‘Certificate of Loss of Earnings’ and present it to the court. For periods up to and including four hours in the first 10 days of jury service, the maximum loss of earnings payment they can claim is currently £31.56 per day. For periods in excess of this, the maximum payment is currently £63.12 per day. However, if you decide to make any payment to the employee during their absence, you cannot claim compensation from the court or any other government department.last_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_imgDespite slow progress earlier this year, East-Lothian-based franchise chain Baguette Express has added 18 outlets to its estate in 2010, and has its eye on London locations.”We have been encouraged by performance in the last six months, but up until May we were not getting new franchisees in. The banks had stopped lending, whatever they say. That left potential franchisees waiting to get funding approved. Thankfully that’s back on stream now,” commented business development manager Jim Stewart.A further four outlets are due to open this year, taking the total tally to 70, up by 10 on 2009.The target is to have at least 150-plus outlets across the whole of the UK in three years’ time, with the first two London outlets set to open by Easter, potentially in Hounslow or Walthamstow, Stewart added.Baguette Express has also started various trials with franchisees to maximise trade, he said. These include a new upmarket coffee and cakes range to bring in off-peak customers.Stewart explained: “Baguette Express was seen as a lunch destination, but we want to change that. Coffee and cakes, such as high-quality muffins, are proving very profitable in the trial outlets, bringing people in at quieter times of the day.”The firm is also trialling an online and mobile ordering system at three of its outlets where customers can place and pre-pay for an order to pick up in-store and has been rolling out more stores in new formats including larger units, particularly those with seated areas in shopping centres, as it expands in England, said Stewart.>>Express deliverylast_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_imgGluten and wheat-free product supplier Nutrition Point has announced its name has changed to Dr Schär UK.The firm, based in Thelwall, Warrington, is taking on the name of its parent company as it aims to diversify into new sectors of the gluten-free market.As part of this expansion Dietary Specials, a Nutrition Point brand, recently launched a gluten-free foodservice range, including rolls, bread, biscuits, sausage rolls and multi-purpose flour mix.By working more closely with its Dr Schär colleagues overseas, the firm said it will be able to focus more on sharing best practice, “developing a global view of trends and innovation, and developing exciting new products which continue to drive the UK gluten free sector forward”.“Nutrition Point has been part of the Dr Schär group for more than a decade, and it’s a logical step for our name to change to reflect this,” commented MD Bob Trice.“It’s a tremendously exciting time for us. We’ve just launched our gluten free foodservice range under our DS-gluten free brand, which has opened up a whole new revenue stream for the company. “It has also helped us to engage restaurateurs and other catering professionals to help them see the massive potential audience they could be welcoming through their doors by making a few small changes to their menu.”The Dr Schär Group employs more than 400 people across Europe, including in its three gluten-free food manufacturing sites in Italy and Germany.>>Gluten-free firms make inroads into foodservicelast_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_imgBakery products will not be allowed to include on-pack claims such as ’no added salt’ and ’x% less…’ following a vote by the European Parliament, banning the European Commission’s proposed labelling amendment.The ban was carried by only 15 votes more than the 378 needed to secure it (393), and has disappointed food manufacturers. A spokesperson for the Food and Drink Federation (FDF) said it did not expect the Commission to issue a new legislative proposal, and the FDF would not be appealing the decision.Martin Turton, manager of the Biscuit, Cake, Chocolate and Confectionery (BCCC) group, said: “BCCC members are very disappointed with the outcome of the EU vote. Members spend large amounts of time and money on reformulation efforts, and should have the opportunity to communicate changes to recipes to consumers, to help them make better choices.”Alice Cadman, head of strategic projects at United Biscuits (UK), a member of the FDF, said: “United Biscuits has invested heavily in its reformulation programme over recent years and, until now, has communicated the benefits of this work to consumers, enabling them to make a positive choice towards products that have been reformulated. Examples include McVitie’s Digestives, which have been reduced in saturated fat by 80%, and McVitie’s Hobnobs, which have been reduced in saturated fat by 75%. So it is hard to understand why the ability to tell consumers about positive changes has been taken away. Far from confusing consumers, the ’x% less’ claim makes it easier for them to identify products that have been reformulated.”Barbara Gallani, director of food safety and science at the FDF, said the European Parlia-ment had underestimated the consumers’ actual ability to read food labels and their desire to make informed decisions.last_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_img WhatsApp Facebook By Carl Stutsman – May 7, 2020 0 434 Previous articleCheap gas is great for consumers, but bad for local roadsNext articleBilly Joel concert rescheduled to June 2021 at Notre Dame Stadium Carl Stutsman CoronavirusIndianaLocalNationalNews Pinterest Google+ WhatsApp Twitter Twitter Pinterest Google+ By Know1one1 [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons With the fall semester still up in the air at Notre Dame how is the school doing with its enrollment goals? They are apparently doing well.Admissions officials even say that in some cases they are ahead of their preset goals. So far they have had about 21,000 applications and they plan to admit close to 38-hundred. Don Bishop, a member of the admissions department, tells WSBT that they only part of the application process that has changed is how students are assessing their options, noting that students aren’t able to visit the campus or attend any off campus events.He also said that the school anticipates a higher demand for financial aid with the current state of the economy, and the school is adjusting to accommodate students and families that will need help.You can find more here Notre Dame enrollment doing well amid pandemic Facebooklast_img read more


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